The chief executive of Island Development Company and Green Island Construction Company, Glenny Savy answered questions in the National Assembly yesterday so that MNAs could determine ways to reduce cost of construction.

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The chief executive of Island Development Company and Green Island Construction Company, Glenny Savy answered questions in the National Assembly yesterday so that MNAs could determine ways to reduce cost of construction.

Post  Sirop14 on Fri Sep 22, 2017 11:27 am

Thursday 21 September 2017
National Assembly
Glenny Savy speaks
The chief executive of Island Development Company and Green Island Construction Company, Glenny Savy answered questions in the National Assembly yesterday so that MNAs could determine ways to reduce cost of construction.
by S. Marivel
“It cost us SCR 25,000 per square meter to build Independence House (Editor's note: Independence House Annex), while other projects only cost us SCR5,000 per square meter,” Mr Savy stated, arguing that the cost of construction is often determined by various factors such as size, materials, and time spent on the project.
He further stated that it cost IDC SCR5 million to fix the Court of Appeal building, and SCR12 million for the Supreme Court – this was in response to MNA Ahmed Afif who wished to determine whether costs have truly reduced over time for government construction.
In addition, it cost IDC up to SCR11 million to build the Mayor’s Office.
Mr. Savy has promised that he will bring all documentary evidence to the Assembly with details on all the construction undertaken by IDC and GICC, as he explains that “no development was done in secret”.
He also stated plainly that while there are talks that many development projects do not undergo a tendering process and go directly to IDC or GICC, “it is not that construction work is lacking in Seychelles, it’s the cost which is an issue – and believe it or not we are quite affordable compared to other companies,” Mr. Savy indicates.
Meanwhile, MNA Flory Larue took the opportunity to question Mr. Savy on who gave him permission to open GICC, and where the paper trail is for proof. She added more questions with regards to construction projects done in collaboration with government, and used examples of Public-private partnership (PPP) funding models for telecommunication companies Cable and Wireless and Airtel for their undersea cables.
In response, Mr. Savy stated clearly that he is merely the CEO of IDC and that it is the Board of Directors who makes decisions and gives him directives. It was them together with the Ministry for Finance who “gave the go ahead for GICC”.
“I also think we need to understand what a PPP really is, but while I don’t have details I believe government also invested into the undersea cables under a partnership agreement,” he added.
It was MNA Wavel Ramkalawan who called for Mr. Savy yesterday morning in order to inquire into the mandate of GIC “to determine whether we can make recommendations on how to reduce the cost of construction,” he said, arguing that costs of construction is one factor leading to rising costs of living.
“If someone wants to build a house, they need a small fortune to do so,” he remarked.
According to Mr. Ramkalawan, it’s been five years since IDC has engaged in commercial construction, however “government feels it’s time for IDC to come out of that sector an focus on development of islands, and they have until end of next year to do so,” he said.
Previously there was a Public Works Department which catered for governmental organisations undertaking construction work.
“When you look at the town area, like Queen’s Building which is now Liberty House or State House, all of it was built by government through that department,” Mr. Ramkalawan notes.
Disagreements came from MNAs Basil Hoareau and Sebastien Pillay, who both reasoned that all motions to bring someone for questioning only applied to ministers and Assembly members – not individuals.
“We are not against the questioning, it’s actually good to do this for transparency, but we need to follow procedures,” Mr. Hoareau explains, giving the example of the Minister for Finance who was called for questioning, while later the Seychelles Trading Corporation Veronique Laporte accompanied him for more questioning.
“We didn’t just call her, or call her first,” he elaborated.
Speaker Patrick Pillay noted that there is a need to modernize the standing orders of the Assembly to allow for these kinds of questioning.

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