Seychelles President James Michel calls Presidential Election

Page 5 of 7 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

LET’S BRING THE FOCUS ON PLANS & ACTIONS

Post  Sirop14 on Tue Feb 02, 2016 1:03 pm

LET’S BRING THE FOCUS ON PLANS & ACTIONS


Following the last disputed Presidential elections we have witnessed countless futile attempts by some of the more fanatical elements in PL to discredit the leaders of the opposition. In particular the fanatics have focused their vitriolic attacks on Wavel, perversely using private family issues to try and denigrate his persona and drag his name in the mire. The forum for this has been mainly in that Facebook site called Dan Lari Bazar, a site that should more aptly be named “Dan Septic Tank”.

However one thing is clear and that is that the “Union for Change” is now a government in waiting, pending the outcome of the court cases. Setting aside the constitutional legalities and interpretation of the 50% rule, there were many other irregularities that have clearly rendered the outcome of those elections flawed and therefore invalid. The SPUP/SPPF/LP have a rich history as violators of the law. They were the first to introduce violence in politics in Seychelles. They were the first to commit high treason with the 5th of June 1977 coup. They were the first to introduce a one party state dictatorship that went on to commit the first political murders in Seychelles. They were the first to imprison Seychellois for their political beliefs. They were the first to exile Seychellois from their own country for political reasons. They were the first to hunt down and assassinate an opposition leader on foreign soil. They were the first to cheat in elections, which they have been doing since 1992 when multiparty democracy was introduced. Indeed this PL cult, the devilish grandchild of the SPUP usurpers are notorious in their criminal skills to do whatever it takes to cling on to power and to serve the best interest of their leaders. The fact that they managed to cheat and conjure up the votes to “win” the last election should be of no surprise to the intelligent mind, be it legally versed in constitutional law or not. Based on their history and sheer logic, the fact that is staring us all clearly in the face is that they cheated and manipulated. James Michel has no moral authority or legitimacy to be the President and we all know it, including him.
Therefore in spite of all the shenanigans, the United Opposition should not be distracted by their perverse attempts to throw dirt on the opposition leaders and try to divide them. On the contrary they should ignore those PL Neanderthals and just get on with the task of preparing for government because when all the dust settles, the opposition will find themselves in government and they should be prepared for when that moment arrives.

Wavel, Pat Pillay, Mrs Amesbury and Philip Boule and their teams should be conducting regular meetings and organizing their government in waiting. They should be laying out plans that outline the reforms that they will implement to bring about the independence, efficiency and accountability of our Public Service, our Police Force and Armed Forces, our Justice system, our hospitals and health authorities, our schools and education systems, the development of our local industries and private enterprises etc. They should be spelling out plans and policies and listening to the feedback from the public. They should also be informing their public on those issues on a regular basis. My feeling is that the people want to hear and constantly be reassured that the opposition remains united, determined but most of all organised and prepared for all eventualities. They should in essence be acting like a parallel government and they should be doing it with confidence.

Furthermore, following the successful march against SBC biased, there is no doubt that the opposition is commanding considerable popularity with the majority of the people. People are enjoying their newfound freedoms to express themselves openly on Seychelles soil. I remember the days when the only place that we could do such things was actually in our places of exile such as London. The opposition should take this opportunity and harness this wave of support further. For example if this court issue drags on for over 100 days after Michel’s illegal tenure of office, the opposition should scrutinize his 100 days promises and if he has failed to deliver as per his own pronouncements, they should organise some show of defiance to ridicule him on that 100th day. There should be more such events to demonstrate the power and determination of the people to restore real democracy and justice in our country but above all to show that we remain UNITED in purpose.

It is only by showing our unity, seriousness and preparedness through concrete plans of action that we will render the vicious attempts of that vacuous minority of PL Neanderthals totally irrelevant and consign them to the rubbish bin of history.

Opinion Editorial by Ralph and Josette Hoarau ( Facebook)

ex J. G. Albert Radyo Divan Sanzman - Seselwa in ler pou koze!
- Interview of Ralph Hoarau, brother of Gerard Hoarau who was assassinated in London UK

https://soundcloud.com/.../rds-seselwa-in-ler-pou-koze-e1...

RDS - Seselwa in ler pou koze!
LIVE broadcast every Sunday, 20h00-23h00 Seychelles time; 16h00-19h00 GMT, 11h00-14h00 Eastern NA.
Quick access: http://www.vibecityradio.com/songs/live-feed-vcr
REPLAYS daily 11h00 & 18h00 Seychelles time; 07h00 & 14h00 GMT, and 02h00 & 09h00 Eastern NA

Comment -

We have listened to Mr Ralph Hoareau radio broadcast - it is a great shame after 39 years the attitude of our fellow Seychellois - those few in 1970' who were looking at an alternative possibilities for then Seychelles and they were not uneducated and illiterate. Those who have greater understanding of our history and position in the Indian Ocean and the world. My person beside as a child had played and grown up with the like of Mr Adam, Mr Roselie, Mr Harry Payet and Mr Tipin. We had know many from the DP and SPUP parties and Office. In all these discussion unlike every nations across the world let alone those with European roots how they present their arguments - their parameters of inclusive topics are very elevated. We need to face the reality and Brutality of Cold War - just ;like when the fisherman goes to fish in the North Manson and south monsoon the basic protein source and the impact on prices. The same with rice and flour - to make bread. The greater forces powers and their institution involved in our politic back in 1960's and after yet - those who manage the little of what we call media their attitude and approach. They do not allow and encourage half normal debate. Some of the Killing and some of the issues impacting FA Rene and current James Michel functionality - the UN, EU and other nation have been pumping hundreds of Millions of dollars to elevate our standard of communication and understanding of Democracy functionality - taking into consideration the mass their communication benchmark. ( Give a small example this morning in the world new in Kenya an elephant killed a white person what had caused/triggered, synergy which triggered this)

https://www.facebook.com/#

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Seychelles President James Michel calls Presidential Election

Post  Sirop14 on Tue Feb 02, 2016 10:09 pm

We started raising the issues November/December 2015. Looking at the requirement to have a conference involving as many players European in Particular and the EU/UN to look at the working of that SIROP program be they an eventual new government develop new parameters. That SIROP program helped and contributed that the SPPF/PL reappraise their position and the decision of those who moved away - leading to Mr Pat Pillay initiatives along with other in the Opposition. Even Africa half baked or Arab half bake politic dynamics when you have such a situation you develop adequate management capabilities to take you beyond. There is the important need and reminder of what happened in 1991 - those who judge they were so very clever used that Program to come forward and then invent completely their own scenario - what ensued. President J A Michel downfall is his over abuse of that Program and we let him know enough is enough. We have developed a platform to show/point to our workings with the USA, Europe, Asian and Russia economy the past 25 years - the ups and down - again the so call expert interpretation - the approach is very simple you say you have an argument how thing are work we can go and go in a completely direction and watch the mess again what your so call experts will say and say. We are very aware of this Program capacity - we have had 25 years to prove it with very in depth experiences. The Opposition will need to pull themselves together - Mr Ralph Hoareau ought to remember distinctly well what took place in 1991/93. For 35 years the Diaspora and exile have pleaded their cause now is the time for them to get together in Europe and hammer what they think is best for Seychelles using all available resources and possibilities. Now this is a/the New Seychelles and causing the incoming government to take the outcome on-board.

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Presidential election – SNP’s petitions

Post  Sirop14 on Wed Feb 03, 2016 11:44 am

Presidential election – SNP’s petitions

03-February-2016
Constitutional Court to listen to preliminary objections on February 9
Following the preliminary hearing of the election petitions yesterday, the Constitutional Court will on February 9 listen to preliminary objections.
After last December’s presidential election, Seychelles National Party (SNP) presidential candidate Wavel Ramkalawan filed two petitions.
In the first petition he asked the Constitutional Court to rule whether the Parti Lepep candidate James Michel actually received 50% of the votes as required under schedule 3 of the Constitution.
The second election petition asked the Constitutional Court to rule on the numerous allegations of irregularities both on the part of the Electoral Commission and the candidates.
Yesterday, the Court first dealt with the petition considering whether to take into account all votes cast or valid votes cast during the presidential election of December last year.
Seychelles NATION has learned that all responses to the petition have been filed along with objections on merits of the case and points of law. Any preliminary objections and points of law shall be heard on February 9, 2016 at 9am.
The Court then dealt with the second petition concerning allegations of irregularities in the presidential election.
All responses to the petition have been filed and the Attorney General representing the third respondent has also filed preliminary objections to the petition.
The preliminary objections shall be heard on February 9, 2016 at 9am.
Meanwhile, an application has also been filed by the petitioner to strike out the Attorney General as a party to the petition considering the alleged irregularities of the presidential election.
The case shall be mentioned again on February 9, 2016 at 9am to give the respondents the opportunity to respond to the application.
According to a document prepared by the court-appointed special Rapporteur and circulated to all media houses, the Court also brought to the attention of the parties that the consolidation of the petitions was technically incorrect as the legislation that was applied only allows for the consolidation of two election petitions.
With the agreement of all parties the petitions shall now be consolidated under section 106 of the Seychelles Code of Civil Procedure.
The hearing date of the consolidated petitions shall proceed on February 15, 2016 at 9am.
Section 106 of Seychelles Code of Civil Procedure reads: If more than one suit has been entered by the same plaintiff against the same defendant or if more than one suit has been entered by different plaintiffs against the same defendant in respect of claims arising out of the same transaction or series of transactions or if cross suits have been entered between the same parties, and the parties sue and are sued respectively in the same capacities, the court may either of its own motion or on the application of any of the parties order such suits or any of them to be consolidated and tried as one suit, if it appears to the court that they can be conveniently tried or disposed of together, and the court may make such other order as may be necessary or expedient for the purpose of trying such suits together, and may make such order as to costs as may be just.

http://www.nation.sc/article.html?id=248292

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Presidential election – SNP’s petitions

Post  Sirop14 on Wed Feb 03, 2016 11:44 am

Presidential election – SNP’s petitions

03-February-2016
Constitutional Court to listen to preliminary objections on February 9
Following the preliminary hearing of the election petitions yesterday, the Constitutional Court will on February 9 listen to preliminary objections.
After last December’s presidential election, Seychelles National Party (SNP) presidential candidate Wavel Ramkalawan filed two petitions.
In the first petition he asked the Constitutional Court to rule whether the Parti Lepep candidate James Michel actually received 50% of the votes as required under schedule 3 of the Constitution.
The second election petition asked the Constitutional Court to rule on the numerous allegations of irregularities both on the part of the Electoral Commission and the candidates.
Yesterday, the Court first dealt with the petition considering whether to take into account all votes cast or valid votes cast during the presidential election of December last year.
Seychelles NATION has learned that all responses to the petition have been filed along with objections on merits of the case and points of law. Any preliminary objections and points of law shall be heard on February 9, 2016 at 9am.
The Court then dealt with the second petition concerning allegations of irregularities in the presidential election.
All responses to the petition have been filed and the Attorney General representing the third respondent has also filed preliminary objections to the petition.
The preliminary objections shall be heard on February 9, 2016 at 9am.
Meanwhile, an application has also been filed by the petitioner to strike out the Attorney General as a party to the petition considering the alleged irregularities of the presidential election.
The case shall be mentioned again on February 9, 2016 at 9am to give the respondents the opportunity to respond to the application.
According to a document prepared by the court-appointed special Rapporteur and circulated to all media houses, the Court also brought to the attention of the parties that the consolidation of the petitions was technically incorrect as the legislation that was applied only allows for the consolidation of two election petitions.
With the agreement of all parties the petitions shall now be consolidated under section 106 of the Seychelles Code of Civil Procedure.
The hearing date of the consolidated petitions shall proceed on February 15, 2016 at 9am.
Section 106 of Seychelles Code of Civil Procedure reads: If more than one suit has been entered by the same plaintiff against the same defendant or if more than one suit has been entered by different plaintiffs against the same defendant in respect of claims arising out of the same transaction or series of transactions or if cross suits have been entered between the same parties, and the parties sue and are sued respectively in the same capacities, the court may either of its own motion or on the application of any of the parties order such suits or any of them to be consolidated and tried as one suit, if it appears to the court that they can be conveniently tried or disposed of together, and the court may make such other order as may be necessary or expedient for the purpose of trying such suits together, and may make such order as to costs as may be just.

http://www.nation.sc/article.html?id=248292

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Seychelles President James Michel calls Presidential Election

Post  Sirop14 on Fri Feb 05, 2016 3:03 pm


Travayer SBC i met en dife dan zot lofis anba kontrol

05-February-2016
Bann travayer dan seksyon marketing kot SBC Hermitage ti yer bomaten azir vitman pour met anba kontrol en dife ki ti pe konmans pran dan enn zot lofis ziska ler bann zofisye Lazans Servis Tenny Dife ek Sovtaz ti arive.
Sa dife, ki ti kantmenm fer enpe dega dan sa lofis, ti afekte loperasyon labitid pour lazournen dan sa seksyon.
“Sa dife in afekte nou masin prensipal ki nou abitye fer nou travay toulezour lola e sa pou afekte enpe nou loperasyon me nou pe esper konsey avek nou tim teknik ek bann enzenyer pour gete si omwen nou kapab prepar nou travay pour tanto (yer swar) akoz travay ki nou fer lo sa masin se met ansanm bann diferan slots pour bann lavertisman ki pase lo televizyon dan aswar,” responsab seksyon marketing SBC, Manmzel Cindy Wirtz, ti eksplike.
I dir sa dife menm si i pa’n detri konpletman sa batiman, in koz en bon pe dega e avek loder lafimen ki reste ek netwayaz pour fer, SBC pe aprezan evalye domaz son bann lekipman e vwar ki mannyer pour reorganiz travay sa seksyon pandan sa bann prosen zour.
Zofisye relasyon piblik Lazans Servis Tenny Dife ek Sovtaz Msye Jones Madeleine lo son kote in dir ki erezman sa dife pa’n ariv dan lannwit ki fer ki domaz pa’n sitan grav akoz ti annan dimoun prezan ki’n azir atan.

http://www.nation.sc/article.html?id=248309

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

President James Michel’s election win

Post  Sirop14 on Sun Feb 07, 2016 12:12 am

President James Michel’s election win

06-February-2016
More congratulatory messages received
Following the victory of President James Alix Michel in the run-off presidential election in December 2015, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Transport has received additional congratulatory messages from various nations, organisations and individuals, which are transmitted to the President of the Republic.
Further to the previous press communiqué issued by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Transport, more heads of State and heads of government, as well as organizations, have expressed their congratulations to the Republic of Seychelles and to President James Alix Michel. They are: Commonwealth of Nations, European Council, European Commission, Hungary, Italian Republic, Kingdom of Morocco, People’s Republic of Bangladesh, Republic of Austria, Republic of Botswana, Republic of Cuba, Republic of Korea, and United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
The following are excerpts of the messages received:
Commonwealth Secretary General – Kamalesh Sharma:
“I write to extend warm congratulations on your inauguration for a renewed term as President of the Republic of Seychelles.
“These elections were one of the most competitive in your country’s history, leading to the first run-off since the resumption of multiparty elections in 1993. Once again, the people of Seychelles demonstrated their commitment to democracy by voting in a largely peaceful process.
“I am confident that under your renewed leadership, Seychelles’ leading role in advancing the values and principles of the Commonwealth will continue to be strengthened. The Commonwealth stands ready to support your government and people, in achieving our shared objectives.
“Please accept my very best wishes for a successful tenure of office and my personal regards.”
President of the European Council Donald Tusk and President of the European Commission – Jean-Claude Juncker:
“On behalf of the European Union, we would like to congratulate you on your re-election as President of the Republic of Seychelles.
“We wish you every success in your mandate. The people of Seychelles have entrusted you with the responsibility of continuing the successful economic path and stability of your country…
“The European Commission and Seychelles enjoy close relations and we stand ready to explore with you and your government new areas of cooperation, which will correspond to Seychelles’ impressive achievement and future challenges..”
President of Hungary – János Áder:
“I would like to express my sincere congratulations to Your Excellency on the occasion of your re-election as President of the Republic of Seychelles.
“I hope that we will be able to further develop the bilateral ties between Hungary and the Republic of Seychelles for the benefit of both our countries and peoples in the coming years...”
President of the Italian Republic – Sergio Mattarella:
“I wish to extend my most sincere congratulations together with my best wishes for carrying out the high task that has been conferred to you.
“I am sure that during the course of your third mandate, the Republic of Seychelles with which the Italian Republic maintains excellent bilateral relations, will continue to play a major role in the stability of the Indian Ocean that Rome looks to with particular consideration.
“I take this opportunity to renew, in the name of Italy and of all Italians sincerest personal wishes.”

King of the Kingdom of Morocco – Mohammed VI:
« Il m’est particulièrement agréable, à l’occasion de Votre réélection à la Présidence de la République des Seychelles, de vous adresser mes félicitations les plus chaleureuses et mes vœux sincères de plein succès dans Votre noble mission.
« En vous renouvelant sa confiance, le people Seychellois a tenu à rendre hommage à vos hautes qualités humaines et aux efforts que vous n’avez cessé de déployer pour la réalisation de ses aspirations à davantage de progrès et de prospérité…»
President of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh –Abdul Mahid:
“Please accept my heartiest congratulations on your re-election as the President of the Republic of Seychelles.
“I firmly believe that under your stewardship the existing friendly relations between Bangladesh and Seychelles will be further strengthened in depth and dimensions in the years ahead.”
Federal President of the Republic of Austria – Heinz Fischer:
“On behalf of the people of Austria, it is my pleasure to congratulate you on your re-election as President of the Republic of Seychelles.
“Austria and Seychelles share manifold priorities of mutual interest, ranging from climate change to sustainable tourism and the promotion of multilateralism. I sincerely hope that during your third term, Excellency, our two countries will be able to expand our longstanding cooperation.”
President of the Republic of Botswana – Seretse Khama Ian Khama:
“I wish to extend my congratulations to you on your re-election as the President of the Republic of Seychelles.
“..As you commence your mandate for the next five years, I wish to reaffirm Botswana’s commitment to further strengthen the bonds of friendship and cooperation that subsist between our two countries for the mutual benefit of our people.”
President of the Council of State and Ministers of the Republic of Cuba – Raul Castro Ruz:
“Esteemed Friend, I extend to you my heartfelt congratulations on the occasion of your re-election as President of the Republic of Seychelles.”
President of the Republic of Korea – Park Guen-hye:
“I would like to extend to you my congratulations on your re-election and a new term as President of the Republic of Seychelles.
“It is my sincere wish that Seychelles, under your leadership, will maintain its political stability and integration, and achieve economic prosperity with the people of Seychelles.
“I expect that the friendly and cooperative relations between our two countries will continue to be further developed and deepened on the auspicious occasion of the 40th anniversary of bilateral diplomatic relations between our two countries in 2016.”
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland – David Cameron:
“Congratulations on your re-election as President of the Republic of Seychelles. I am proud of the strong ties between the UK and Seychelles, based on the common interests and shared values that you have done much to foster during your previous terms as President. I recall, in particular, our productive meeting in Downing Street at the time of the Somalia Conference in 2012.
“Over the course of your new term I am confident that we can work together on a number of important issues, such as the implementation of the ambitious climate change agreement reached last year in Paris, maritime security and development of the Blue Economy.
“I also welcome your leadership in your role as chair of both the Alliance of Small Island States and the Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia this year.
“I look to strengthening our cooperation further in the years ahead.”

Source Seychelles Nation

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Seychelles: a second opportunity to democratise

Post  Sirop14 on Sun Feb 07, 2016 12:46 pm

Seychelles: a second opportunity to democratise

When Professor Bruce Baker and Professor Roy May, two African experts at the University of Coventry, in Britain, visited Seychelles in November last year to undertake a field trip, as usual the government used their presence to make propaganda on behalf of the SPFF, the ruling party led by former President Albert Rene.

The Government controlled Seychelles Nation did not tell its readers very much about the credentials of the two academics and their mission in our country. Instead, it put into the mouths of the two academics things they never said, according to the professors whom we spoke to on November 24th, last year. For example, Nation quoted them as saying “This country has clearly made a lot of progress democratically since the transition, and we thought that story should be recorded and the challenges that you face for the future should be noted.” In reality they never actually said anything of that sort. They had just arrived and had spoken to very few people, according to the two academics.

This week the British academics have made available to this newspaper an advanced copy of their findings which will be published in academic journals as well as being subject of lectures. Their findings expose the Government propaganda machine for what we know it is: a propaganda machine. The academics admitted that in their professional opinion, our country has made little advance in the area of good governance and democracy since the one-party state more than a decade ago.

Entitled Seychelles: a second opportunity to democratise, the report made the following critical remarks right from the word go. “When, after fourteen years of one-party rule, President René announced a return to multi-party government at the Extraordinary Congress of the SPPF in December 1991, there was a mixture of apprehension and excitement… The following nineteen months saw many of the institutions associated with democracy put in place: the registration of political parties; a constitutional commission; a constitution embedding fundamental human, political, and economic rights passed by referendum; an electoral commissioner; and multiparty presidential and legislative elections… Yet, though the institutional form of governance changed, in practice very little changed. The years 1993-2004 were a lost opportunity for democracy. Neither President René nor his SPPF party found it easy to release their grip… Indeed, the period saw the systematic undermining or even corruption of the new political system. Democracy faltered, largely due to deliberate tampering by a government that was still largely indistinguishable from the SPPF party. It was not that the new institutions were abolished; they were undermined. They were permeated by partisanship; manipulated to serve the interests of the SPPF. They functioned, but only in as much as they did not threaten the government-SPPF interests. It has to be said that President René did not appear to have any interest in allowing democracy to flourish.”

The professors Bruce Baker and Roy May are not any fly-by-night mercenary academics who are prepared to publish anything their paymasters wish. Their trip to Seychelles was part of their academic work and their costs were born by their institution, the Coventry University Business School.

Professor Bruce Baker is a Senior Research Fellow at the Applied Research Centre for Human Security, Coventry University. He is currently engaged in an ESRC project examining informal and formal policing in post-conflict African states. His publications include: Taking the Law into Their Own Hands: Lawless Law Enforcers in Africa (Ashgate, 2002); Escape from Domination in Africa: political disengagement and its consequences (James Currey, 2000); and articles in Third World Quarterly, Politics, Commonwealth and Comparative Politics, Journal of Contemporary African Studies, Democratization, Terrorism and Political Violence, Journal of Modern African Studies, Contemporary Politics, Journal of Humanitarian Assistance, Policing and Society, Society in Transition, Conflict Security and Development, and International Journal of the Sociology of Law. He has conducted fieldwork in Zimbabwe, Mozambique, South Africa, Rwanda, Uganda, The Gambia, Sierra Leone and Cape Verde.

Professor Roy May is Professor Emeritus of African Politics and the Director of the African Studies Centre. He taught undergraduate and postgraduate courses in African politics, development, aid and Third World politics. His original interest in this area came from service with the Royal West African Frontier Force in Sierra Leone. His research interests include Chad, the Franco-African relationship, the role of NGOs, militarism and peacekeeping.

The findings on Seychelles may appear at first sight negative, but it is offered not in an attempt to condemn and dismiss, but as a critique to promote change and progress. Some matters may be beyond the control of Seychelles’ Government, such as global economic conditions, but the aspects of governance recorded in this report are an area where advancement is achievable and would enhance the life of the Seychellois. It is a second opportunity for democracy that the authors earnestly hope the country will take.

The report highlighted that the stepping down of President Rene in 2004 in favour of Vice-President Michel was a very significant time for Seychelles. And with Michel receiving his own mandate in the presidential elections of 2006, Seychelles has what could be a momentous second opportunity for democracy. The first opportunity was squandered, but the opportunity has returned and many in the country are eager to see what will happen.

The main report is divided into the eight key areas of democratic governance: the constitution and rule of law; the judiciary; the national assembly; elections; civil society; the internal security forces; economic life; and the executive.

According to the report, laws are not always strictly adhered to by senior government figures when it is in their interests to do otherwise. It pointed out that ministers are not putting all government contracts out to tender, but offering unspecified contracts on the basis of private negotiations or offering government land without auction or tender (e.g. sale of former US tracking station; and the lease of Eden Island). The privatisation of the prawn factory that is part of the Seychelles Marketing Board was only announced in the National Assembly on 20th November, it is alleged that prior to tender a memorandum of understanding already exists with a company to purchase it.

It is stated in the report that the judiciary successfully deals with many cases according to the law. And the Appeal’s Court does overturn many unsafe judgments. However, that does not alter the fact that there is overwhelming evidence of corruption, disregard for procedures and plain incompetence within the system. Judicial abuse now arguably constitutes the single most serious governance issue requiring reform. The core of the problem seems to lie in the recruitment of judges. Despite the availability of eligible Seychellois, the SPPF government has persisted in hiring foreigners as judges (though admittedly one of the five judges and two of the four magistrates are currently Seychellois by birth). It is hard to explain this in any other way than that it is regarded as advantageous to have persons that are open to influence because of their vulnerability unless or until they are offered Seychellois citizenship. Certainly the pattern of judgments that have flowed from the judges suggests that they do what is expected of them. These are harsh words and require some justification.

France Bonté, who is on the central committee of the SPPF, is also the Chairman of the Constitutional Appointments Authority, a body responsible for appointing judges. Hence the judges are faced by a prosecution led by the chair of the body that appoints them. We find such a conflict of interests indefensible. Furthermore, the situation in the judiciary as it stands at present does not give the appearance that a supporter of the opposition could win a case. As the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights argued in its July 2004 report: ‘Members appointed to the CAA should not be active members of any political party. It is vital that the Seychellois should perceive the CAA to be independent in order for them to have confidence in the persons that the CAA recommends for appointments.’

Articles based on the report will be published in leading academic Africanist and International Affairs journals by the professors. The full text of their findings will be published in this publication when it is officially made public.

http://www.seychellesweekly.com/January26_2007/Page%201%20Opportunity.html


Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Election petition

Post  Sirop14 on Sun Feb 07, 2016 12:51 pm

Election petition

AG accused of "lack of impartiality"

Wavel Ramkalawan's lawyers have asked the court to remove Attorney General Ronny Govinden from the list of respondents, following his remarks that he "totally supports" James Michel and Hendrick Gappy. Mr Govinden will respond to the application next Tuesday in the Constitutional court.

Wavel Ramkalawan has asked the Constitutional court to strike off the name of the Attorney General (AG), Ronny Govinden, from the list of respondents in the petition contesting the election results that was filed earlier this year. This latest application was made on Tuesday by the petitioner’s legal team after the three respondents, James Michel, Hendrick Gappy and Ronny Govinden, filed their defense before the Constitutional Court a few days ago.

The leading counsel for Mr Ramkalawan, Bernard Georges, told TODAY that the decision was taken to request the court to strike out the AG from the case after Ronny Govinden said in his affidavit that he “totally supports the two respondents, James Michel and Hendrick Gappy”. Mr Georges claims that this showed "a lack of impartiality and independence" whilst the AG is supposed to be there "in a neutral capacity to assist the court from a position of impartiality”.

“He is there, as per the legal requirement of the Elections Act and should show restraint”, Bernard Georges told TODAY, adding that the AG “should come forward only when it is required of him by the court”. The Elections Act states that “where the petitioner is not the Attorney-General, the Attorney-General shall be made a respondent to the petition”.

Mr Ramkalawan also explained on social media why he wants the AG removed from the case. "The main reason is the fact that the Attorney General has clearly stated that he will support the Electoral Commission and Mr. Michel in everything they will present, and that was even before Basil Hoareau filed his answer. We feel that the Attorney General has compromised his position. He should have shown total impartiality in the matter".
Mr Govinden will respond to this application next Tuesday during the second mention of the election petition. Also on that day, the Constitutional Court consisting of Chief Justice Mathilda Twomey, Judges McKee and Akiiki-Kiiza, will hear preliminary objections to the two petitions made by the three respondents, before the hearing starts on 15 February.

But already Samantha Aglae representing the Electoral Commission told the SBC on Tuesday night that they intend to ask the court to dismiss the petition on the basis that Mr Ramkalawan’s lawyers filed their petition under the wrong section of the Constitution. This statement has created a heated debate on social media, one that saw Mr Ramkalawan intervene to ask people to "stop jumping to conclusions", and to let the court be the judge of the issues raised.

James Michel's lawyer Basil Hoareau also told the SBC that he believed the matter of valid votes versus votes cast had already been interpreted by the court in the PDM case. Mr Ramkalawan replied to comments relating to this on social media by saying the following: "Have those commenting on the case read the petitions or is it not a matter of having heard Basil Hoareau on SBC news? The case begins on the 15th February. The PDM case dealt with Schedule 2 and the present case is Schedule 3. Let us not confuse the people, but rather let us follow the facts as they are presented in court".

This newspaper has learnt that the SBC also sought the views of Mr Ramkalawan and his lawyer but that they declined to comment because they did not wish to "prejudice the case". The two election petitions alleging irregularities during the Presidential election were filed on 28 December 2015 and 5 January 2016 after the Presidential runoff which took place on 16, 17 and 18 December.

Source Facebook Political Analyst

Comment -

John Louise This guy is the puppet of michel.if he was impartial he would have seen that the public order act was unconstitutional and advice the president in this respect.instead of defending the constitution he defends michel.in my opinion he is too arrogant and has a big ego.

Houareau Herbert Who ever works for the government of the day even if the person is extra Qualified is alway rubbish for the opposition. One has to think and re think that we are all brothers and sisters and we are all connected in one way or another through a family. If we should find partial or impartial people then we are in a wrong country. In one way or another we are all impartial judging on our religion, political affiliation or business. All are related in one way or another to the other.we are too small to judge one another. Lets keep moving and build our country for our children and tomorrow.

John Louise So herbert houareau if we might be all related then when we see something wrong we should just let it be because we know each other and we might be related?..we are not talking about his qualifications here,but in the way he performs his duties.to some people being impartial is being in parti lepep's favour.why can't people look at things with an open mind.it is exactly because we want to build a better future for our children that we want things to be done the right way.in this country we see people who are suppose to be working for all seychellois no matter what political opinion,openly showing their favour for the ruling party.this is not right at all.

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Union for change

Post  Sirop14 on Wed Feb 10, 2016 6:52 pm

Union for change


Leaders denounce victimization
Leaders of the four parties that make up the Union for Change denied rumours of rift within the movement.
Some people, including students are being victimised because of their - or their parents' political affiliation, the leader of Lalyans Seselwa Patrick Pillay and that of the Seychelles National Party (SNP) Wavel Ramkalawan said on Sunday during a gathering of opposition supporters in Anse Royale.
Patrick Pillay deplored what he said was the “ongoing victimization of opposition supporters by the government”. He claimed that some students who have just completed their IGCSE exams with very good results, have been penalized by being denied entrance into post-secondary institutions because of their parents’ political affiliation. “I have written to Education Minister MacSuzy Mondon to request an electronic copy of all the results and also the criteria used to select students for post-secondary institutions and I am yet to hear from her”, said Mr Pillay who vouched that the opposition will not stay quiet on the matter, much to the delight of the crowd who cheered and clapped.
My Pillay also introduced Police Constable Nichole Lenclume, who he said had been dismissed unfairly by the force. He explained that Mrs Lenclume received a letter stating that “your request for discharge has been approved by the Commissioner of Police” but said that such a request was never made by the Police Constable.
Both Mr Pillay and SNP leader, Wavel Ramkalawan said that the Union for Change would get to the bottom of this particular incident as well as other cases of alleged victimization "to ensure that no person is penalized for his or her political beliefs".
Mr Ramkalawan for his part, praised Mrs Lenclume for coming forward and speaking out, calling on opposition supporters to do away with fear and to stand up for their rights “as we the leaders are ready to stand by you all the way if you are willing to fight for justice”.
Sunday’s gathering was aimed at touching base with the supporters but also to dismiss rumours about infighting amongst the four leaders who came together to form the Union for Change movement after the first round of the 2015 Presidential election.
Over 1000 supporters converged in the largest district in south Mahe to listen to the leaders who addressed the crowd on Sunday afternoon.
Speaking on behalf of Alexia Amesbury, Flory Larue from the Seychelles Party for Social Justice and Democracy (SPSD), called on supporters to remain focused and not to be sidetracked by what she called idle gossip and rumours of internal friction within the party.
“We all believe in one thing and that is to remove James Michel from State House. We have already made an important step in that direction so let us not fall prey to rumours aimed at creating discord among us”, she said.
Ms Larue’s call for unity was echoed by Philippe Boulle and Peter Roselie. “When we call for a gathering and you turn up en masse, your presence speaks louder than any words we can say. It sends a powerful message, a message that we are strong and we will continue to fight”, said Mr Boulle.
For his part, Peter Roselie, called on the supporters to remain patient as the struggle to freedom, he said, was a long one.”Things may not be moving as fast you would like but I can guarantee you that things are being done every day to bring about the change that we all want”, he claimed.
Mr Roselie also denied allegations of a rift among the leaders saying, “we don’t fight, we have frank discussions and we disagree because we all want what’s best for the people. Our team is a strong one and a united one”.
Speaking on the matter of the election petition, Wavel Ramkalawan explained to supporters that the movement's legal team had filed an application in the Constitutional court calling for the removal of Attorney-General, Ronny Govinden “for showing a lack of impartiality and independence towards the case”. Mr Ramkalawan said that “if he is not removed, we will boycott his presence in court by advising our witnesses to refrain from answering any of his questions”.
Mr Ramkalawan also said the opposition team was still negotiating with the Supreme court to have an area where the supporters will be able to follow the proceedings, adding that he will update the supporters on the issue shortly.
Mr Ramkalawan also thanked all those who took part in the march against the Seychelles Broadcasting Corporation (SBC), saying that the protest march has started to bring results. ”SBC Board met us before the deadline set, they have agreed to include the voice of the opposition in the news like we saw recently when Journalist Kevin Malbrook interviewed one of our activists from Baie-Lazare, Jacques Pool on the matter of Wilby Lucas. And the leaders will be taking part in the ‘ZOOM’ programme at the end of the month to talk about freedom of information and we will give our reaction to the State of the Nation Address”, he said, adding that “we marched and made our voices heard and things are slowly moving in the right direction”.
All the speakers who took to the stage hinted that there will be another march soon although no information was forthcoming on the matter, as they urged supporters to be ready to take part in any other demonstration.
Sunday’s gathering was also a chance for the movement to get signatures to be able to register the Union for Change as a political party soon with the aim of taking part in the legislative elections due this year.

https://www.facebook.com/todayinsey/posts/941459629225181

Petisyon kont rezilta eleksyon: Zafer pou ekoute ziska i fini

10-February-2016
Dan petisyon ki Msye Wavel Ramkalawan in anmennen an kour kont rezilta dezyenm tour eleksyon prezidansyel, kot Komisyon Eleksyon in deklar li perdan kont Prezidan James Michel, zafer pou kontinyen ziska ki i fini ekoute.
Se sa ki Lakour Konstitisyonnel in deside, apre ki bann avoka ladefans ti’n demande ki zafer i dismis akoz i pa ti’n fayle anba seksyon lalwa ki ti devret.
Sef Ziz Mathilda Twomey ki pe prezid sa zafer, in dir ki Lakour in rezerv son desizyon lo sa demann ziska ki zafer i fini ekoute.
Lezot de ziz ki pe asiz akote li i Ziz McKee ek Ziz Akiiki-Kiiza.
Dan sa zafer, Msye Ramkalawan in anmenn de petisyon kont biro Konmisyoner Eleksyon, Prezidan Michel limenm ek biro Prokirer Zeneral. I pe dir ki rezilta eleksyon pa valid akoz ti annan iregilarite e ki dapre bann vot ki’n anrezistre – e non pa bann vot valid – Msye Michel pa’n ganny plis ki 50% ki permet li ganny deklare prezidan.
Dapre sa bann avoka -- Samantha Aglae pour Konmisyoner Eleksyon, Basil Hoareau ek Laura Valabjhi pour Prezidan Michel, e Prokirer Zeneral Ronny Govinden ki pe reprezant son biro, sa petisyon ti’n devret ganny anmennen anba Lartik 130 Konstitisyon e non pa anba Lartik 51. Otreman, zot largiman sete ki rezilta eleksyon ti’n devret ganny konteste par en petisyon eleksyon e non par en petisyon konstitisyonnel.
Zot ti azoute ki anba Lartik 130, Lakour Konstitisyonnel napa zirisdiksyon pour deklare ki prezidan in ganny elekte ilegalman, e donk fer eleksyon al dan en trwazyenm tour.
«Prosedir in ganny abize e pa kapab annan zirisdiksyon,» Prokirer Zeneral ti par egzanp plede.
I ti azoute ki si sa petisyon i ganny aksepte, i pou kre en move presedans e Konstitisyon pa pou ganny respekte.
Msye ek Madanm Bernard Georges ki pe reprezant Msye Ramkalawan, ti lo zot kote reponn ki i kler ki zot in prezant en petisyon eleksyon, me ki pe rod en lenterpretasyon Konstitisyon lo vot ki’n anrezistre dan eleksyon. Zot ti azoute ki pour zot, eleksyon pa ankor fini akoz vot in mal konte an rezilta en move lenterpretasyon Konstitisyon.
«Sel fason pour montre ki vot in mal konte se atraver sa petisyon,» Msye Georges ti dir.
Zafer petisyon eleksyon in anvoye pour Lendi, 9er bomaten. Sa i akoz se sa zour ki Lakour pou donn en desizyon lo si Prokirer Zeneral pou reste dan sa zafer ou non. Sa in vin apre en demann bann avoka Msye Ramkalawan ki dir ki akoz Msye Govinden in klerman dir ki i pe siport Prezidan Michel ek Konmisyoner Eleksyon dan sa zafer, i pa enparsyel e in pran en pozisyon partizan.
Msye Govinden in lo son kote argimante ki sa aplikasyon i bezwen dismis, akoz i pa baze lo okenn pwen lalwa e ki sete Msye Ramkalawan limenm ki’n anmenn li dan sa zafer.
In azoute ki dan sa mosyon, Konstitisyon in ganny mal enterprete lo drwa ek privilez Prokirer Zeneral, osi ki son lendepandans pour pran en pozisyon baze lo lalwa ek fe.
Msye Ramkalawan in osi fayle en zafer kont Lazans Proteksyon Sosyal, kot i pe dir ki sa lazans in enplike dan pratik ilegal. Sa i akoz dapre li, dan bann zour avan eleksyon, Lazans Servis Sosyal in donn larzan dimoun ki pa ti sipoze gannyen.
Lakour Konstitisyonnel pou donn en verdik le 15 Fevriye dan sa enn zafer.

Source Seychelles Nation

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

National Assembly elections

Post  Sirop14 on Wed Feb 10, 2016 6:57 pm

National Assembly elections


Parties gear up
This year’s National Assembly elections are James Michel's priority, he said last Friday. The Union for Change is also getting ready for this second battle.
The last word on the outcome of the 2015 Presidential election might still not have been said yet with the election petition challenging the results currently before the Constitutional Court but already attention is shifting to the upcoming National Assembly elections.
While the dates of the Parliamentary elections are as yet unknown, James Michel said in an interview published by Parti Lepep mouthpiece "The People" last Friday that his priority is "to win the National Assembly elections".
"We are always ready. The elections are due this year. We are aware that we are in a different political configuration and this is all the more reason why we need to be ready. We will win those elections! Our structure, our mobilisation, our success, our love for Seychellois, the support of our base, everything's here. We will mobilise with an even greater determination", Mr Michel said.
But Parti Lepep is not alone in getting ready for this second battle. On Sunday, the Union for Change, which is currently engaged in registering the movement as a political party so that all opposition parties fight the battle together, mobilised its troups in Anse Royale.
Its aim is to win two thirds of the seats in the National Assembly. Speaking to supporters, the leader of the Seychelles National Party (SNP), Wavel Ramkalawan, said that winning two thirds of the seats will allow them to "bring some changes to the Constitution".
One of the main changes they want to introduce is to abolish the practice of a shared Presidency (pas baton). "If you need to leave the Presidency, you'll have to resign and we'll hold fresh elections", he explained.
The second amendment the Union for Change wants to bring to the Constitution also has to with the Presidency. "A President should only be able to serve two terms and not three as is currently the case", Mr Ramkalawan said.
Not surprisingly, Parti Lepep is less concerned with amendments to the Constitution. What the party wants and will presumably do all it can to achieve is to retain its supremacy in the National Assembly.
But the party leader is aware that this is easier said than done. For starters, the 2016 elections contrarily to the 2011 ones, will not be boycotted by the opposition; instead Parti Lepep will face a united opposition.
This and the fact that Lalyans Seselwa is a breakaway from Parti Lepep is one of the reasons Mr Michel thinks his party did not do so well in the 2015 Presidential election. "There were six candidates in the December election and the political landscape was different. People who were with us before and who shared our ideals, those who helped us build Seychelles, who knew the structures of the party, have turned and have fought against us. We were under attack on different fronts", he said in the interview before asserting that "we need to listen to people" and the message they have sent the ruling party by not voting massively in its favour.
Mr Ramkalawan, for his part, does not intend to make things easy for Parti Lepep. "There's a lot of work to be done and we need to be activists and to spread the message, speak to people in Parti Lepep and explain to them that the party is a has been and that James Michel is a burden for the country and that he's pulling us back".
James Michel on the other hand believes that his party can mobilise even more people than it did during the Presidential election. He told "The People" that the party is not making 100% use of its mobilisation capacity. "We have the potential to do even better. Our base strength is about 30 000 adults. I believe we have much more support than that", he said.
James Michel's State of the Nation Address (SONA) due at the end of this month should provide more clarity on the tactics government will use to ensure a victory at the next National Assembly elections.
Meanwhile, the audit of the different ministries is said to be ongoing with the deadline of James Michel's first 100 days looming on the horizon. Asked whether there will be a cabinet reshuffle before the 100 days expire, Mr Michel was evasive: "It's normal that people are expecting change in the first 100 days (...) We want the work to be dynamic", he said, adding that implementing some of the measures that have already been announced is his priority.

https://www.facebook.com/todayinsey/posts/941460919225052

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Seychelles President James Michel calls Presidential Election

Post  Sirop14 on Thu Feb 11, 2016 3:20 pm



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2Hd67WO0L4&feature=youtu.be

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

State-of-the-nation address February 16

Post  Sirop14 on Thu Feb 11, 2016 8:15 pm

State-of-the-nation address February 16

11-February-2016
President James Michel will deliver his nationwide year 2016 State-of-the-nation address to the National Assembly on Tuesday February 16, 2016.
The event, which will mark the National Assembly’s first sitting for the first term of 2016, will start at 5pm.
It is a constitutional requirement that the head of state delivers a state-of-the nation address on the occasion of the first National Assembly sitting each year.
After the address, the Assembly will adjourn until Friday February 19 at 9am when leaders from both sides of the house – leader of the opposition David Pierre and leader of government business Marie-Antoinette Rose – will give their replies to the address.
The other members will also give their reply to the address during the three days of debate.

Source Seychelles Nation

Letter to the Editor - Grow fish, President Michel is right

http://www.nation.sc/article.html?id=248376

Letter to the Editor - ‘Creole language must be put in realistic perspective’

http://www.nation.sc/article.html?id=248374

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Seychelles President James Michel calls Presidential Election

Post  Sirop14 on Mon Feb 15, 2016 8:26 am

We have been en-devouring to break hour head with the Constitutions Court hearing due to begin 15/2/2016 0 We have covered addressed the many arguments at forum Presidential election 2015.
CJ Mathilda Towmey was educated in Britain and France - acquired her legal education. As such the Justice system over 1000 years of both countries their progress, process and vast complexities.
Our Justice System look from the outside and inside has still a very long way to go to come up to their standard and professionalism.
This mean that a good deal of positive arguments contributions ideas works like water on duck feathers.
For instance in EU, several countries, including Britain and France do acknowledge the important impact of the change which occurred between 1987 to 2000 influence the Justice interpretation and many other aspects and many aspects which had tot be undated and written and reconstructed. Including the West and East German Justice system.
We have written to many about that SIROP program important impacts on EU greater workings, the USSR and the necessity to manage them - we/i have been involved in this process from 1987 - this include political process in Germany. The changing of political power and he personalities. Those who ought o know and remember.
We had been importantly embroiled in the debacle of chancellor Gerhard schroder coming to Office and events and developments - much more important our email to him his office explaining who we were and the impacts to help is migrate from London and the difference this would make o German real politic. He refused to listen - what ensued is very interesting remind us of the current situation in Seychelles. Beside we gad gone to Berlin specially for the 2015 Presidential election in Seychelles to monitor and see with other how the/managing the dynamic from a different European location impact political workings and election outcome. All those in USA, London, Paris, China, Vatican, Berlin , Netherlands aware. The large Chinese group we sat until late to discus the situation.
We are going to copy and past section of Wikipedia on what took place in the Bundestag, books and debated and many topic have been written what took place safe just little Seychelles refuse to think use their heads. In the end he had to concede to Angela Merkle.
We are writing and addressing this to underline - the political process we started in 1987, the lies, deviousness, cover-up and corruption - to state if/should the Constitutions Commission/Court Fail you the people/nation of Seychelles options and the Oppositions options and possibilities - President J A Michel is very aware he is just to thick in the head until changes come.

The 2005 German federal elections were held on 18 September. After the elections, neither Schröder's SPD-Green coalition nor the alliance between CDU/CSU and the FDP led by Angela Merkel achieved a majority in parliament, but the CDU/CSU had a stronger popular electoral lead by one percentage point. Since the SPD had been trailing the CDU by more than 15 points only weeks before the election, this outcome was a surprise and was mainly attributed to Schröder's charisma and prowess as a campaigner;[citation needed] polls consistently showed that he was much more popular with the German people than Merkel.[citation needed] On election night, both Schröder and Merkel claimed victory and chancellorship, but after initially ruling out a grand coalition with Merkel, Schröder and Müntefering entered negotiations with her and the CSU's Edmund Stoiber. On 10 October, it was announced that the parties had agreed to form a grand coalition. Schröder agreed to cede the chancellorship to Merkel, but the SPD would hold the majority of government posts and retain considerable control of government policy.[4] Merkel was elected chancellor on 22 November.

http://www.theguardian.com/…/german-elections-coalitions-co…

German elections: rainbow coalitions
Do you know your traffic light coalition from your tiger-duck alliance and your Pizza connection? And how could the various permutations of possible British coalitions be named? Make your suggestions in the comment thread
THEGUARDIAN.COM|BY PHILIP OLTERMANN

https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fbooks.google.co.uk%2Fbooks%3Fid%3DmV3qAQAAQBAJ%26pg%3DPT289%26lpg%3DPT289%26dq%3Dchancellor%2520schroder%2520rainbow%2520coalition%26source%3Dbl%26ots%3DlqYnJlhlHm%26sig%3DlX_t43Z-XCqshFV34yn56ytg5OM%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DX%26ved%3D0ahUKEwj1serzmvjKAhWLaxQKHYUJB6EQ6AEINDAD%23v%3Donepage%26q%3Dchancellor%2520schroder%2520rainbow%2520coalition%26f%3Dfalse&h=iAQF8de8P

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

15th February 2016: ELECTION PETITIONS: Summary of Proceedings by the Special Rapporter

Post  Sirop14 on Mon Feb 15, 2016 5:19 pm

15th February 2016: ELECTION PETITIONS: Summary of Proceedings by the Special Rapporter
Submitted by Joelle on Mon, 02/15/2016 - 13:53

Day 4:  MA 13/2016:  Wavel John Charles Ramkalawan v Electoral Commission, herein represented by HendrickGappy, James Alix Michel and Attorney-General.

The Constitutional Court is made up of the Honourable Chief Justice Twomey, Honourable Judge McKee and Honourable Judge Akiiki-Kiiza. Mr. Wavel Ramkalawan (Petitioner) was represented by Mr. Bernard Georges and Mrs Annette Georges. The Electoral Commission (First Respondent) was represented by Miss Samantha Aglae, Mr James Michel (Second Respondent) was represented by Mr Basil Hoareau together with Mrs Laura Valabhji and Honourable Attorney-General together Mr Ananth Subramanian for the Attorney-General (Third Respondent).

The ruling on the application MA 13/2016 to strike out the Attorney-General from the CP1/2016 – “Election alleged irregularities” Petition was delivered by the Honourable Chief Justice Twomey.

The Attorney-General is joined as is required Rule 7 (4) of the Presidential and National Assembly Election (Election Petition) Rules 1998. It was unanimously held that the role of the Attorney-General when not representing clients is to represent the interest of government and to provide assistance to the Court. The Court was of the opinion that the Attorney-General was incorrect to align his response with the pleadings and evidence to be presented by the Electoral Commission and Mr James Michel without independent grounds for doing so. Whilst it is not allowed for the Attorney-General to adopt the pleadings of another party, this does not prevent the Attorney-General from coming to a similar opinion as that of another party. Even if the Attorney-General has formed an independent opinion that there have been no irregularities in the election process, it does not mean that this information is within his personal knowledge and therefore cannot be provided as evidence on the Court record through an affidavit. In the defence of the Attorney-General to the Petition the supporting affidavit of Principal State Counsel, Mr David Esparon, places on record his belief that the election was free from irregularities and adopts the pleadings and evidence of the Electoral Commission and Mr James Michel. The Court held that this is clearly not within Mr Esparon’s knowledge or ability to prove and as such the affidavit  fails to meet the requirement of s.170 of the Seychelles Civil Procedure Code** and cannot be admitted into the court record.

It was further held that it would not be appropriate to remove the Attorney-General from a case of such importance. However the Court reminds the Attorney-General of his role to this Court to provide an independent perspective, and when matters fall outside his knowledge or expertise, to remain silent on such.

The Court made the following order:

a.     The application to strike out the Attorney-General is dismissed.

b.     The Affidavit of Mr Esparon is struck out of the proceedings.

c.     The defence on the merits of the Attorney-General is struck out of the proceedings.

The Court then dealt with a new application filed by Mr Wavel Ramkalawan. Mr Wavel Ramkalawan believes that Mr James Michel is in possession of information relating to a number of the alleged illegal practices and prays the Court to call Mr James Michel, at an early stage of the trial, to give personal answers** on some of these denied allegations.

The Chief Justice stated that the matters should be heard inter partes and time was given to the other parties to respond to the Petition. The responses will be heard on Tuesday 16th February at 9 am.

CP 7/2015: “Valid votes” case

Mr Bernard Georges submitted on behalf of Mr Wavel Ramkalawan that the simple issue in this case is whether, on the interpretation of the Constitution, Mr James Michel cleared the threshold of 50% of the votes in the second ballot and consequently whether he should be have been declared President.

Mr Georges submitted that to achieve the 50% threshold the number of votes in favour of each candidate should have been measured against the total number of votes deposited in the ballot boxes at every polling station in the second ballot, irrespective of their content. In the alternative the measurement should be against all votes deposited in the ballot boxes save for those mutilated or torn. Mr Georges submitted that the Court would have determine what the terms “votes in an election” in paragraph 5 and “votes cast” in paragraph 8 of Schedule 3 of the Constitution mean in law, in fact and in practice. If these terms refer to all votes which were deposited in the ballot boxes in the second ballot then the calculation of the Electoral Commission was wrong and Mr James Michel did not obtain more than 50% of the votes. If on the other hand, the terms refer to valid votes only then the calculations was correct and Mr James Michel had obtained 50% of the vote.

Mr Georges relied on four main arguments:

Constitutionally a rejected vote cast in the exercise of a fundamental right cannot be ignored.
On the interpretation of the Constitution, the above terms mean that every vote vast into the ballot box, other than a torn or mutilated vote, are to be counted for calculating the 50% threshold.
A presidential mandate is required to be clear and unambiguous. Only 50% of all votes (save perhaps for a torn or mutilated vote) will achieve that purpose.
The reasoning in the PDM** judgment is sound and is not a bar to this action.
Mr Georges argued Schedule 3 of the Constitution that deals with the Presidential election provides for a threshold that the successful candidate must clear. The effect of this provision is that a subsequent ballot will be held until the threshold is achieved by one candidate and that the Constitution envisages any number of ballots until this is achieved. This threshold however does not exist in National Assembly elections and as such this Petition can be distinguished from the interpretation in the PDM case.

In considering the right of every citizen to vote set out in article 24 of the Constitution, Mr Georges submitted that every vote is to have an equal value. A distinction must be made between a person who consciously decides to vote blank or vote in a manner that the vote will be rejected than a person who stays at home and refuses to participate in elections and the former’s vote should have equal value to that of a person who choses one or other of the candidates. It therefore follows that although it is not counted for all purposes it must be counted for the purpose of computing the 50% threshold.

Mr Georges made comparison with other jurisdictions and referred to the Kenyan case of Odinga v Kenyatta which he argued supports the proposition that a vote is a vote irrespective of whether it is rejected or valid. Whilst the laws in Kenya go as far as to say that a rejected vote is null and void, the laws of Seychelles do not go so far and taking into account the competing rights of citizens Mr Georges submitted that rejected votes, which cannot be ascribed to one or other candidate, should still count towards the threshold.

In addressing the possible scenario that no candidate would pass the threshold in subsequent to the second ballot Mr Georges argued that the incumbent President can remain in power until a person is elected so there would not be a scenario where the Seychelles would be left without a President.  Nonetheless Mr Georges urged the Court not to hypothesize on scenarios may never occur.

In response, Mrs Aglae for the Electoral Commission submitted that the words
“votes cast” in paragraph 8 and “votes in an election” in paragraph 5 are qualified by the word “receive” which means received by a candidate and accordingly can only mean a valid vote. She further submitted that this issue was decided in the case of PDM and that Mr Georges has not brought anything new before the Court to allow the enlargement of the definition of “votes cast”.  She relied on s.34 (2) of the Elections Act to substantiate her argument that where a ballot paper is rejected (as per s. 34 (2) EA which papers are rejected) it is endorsed with the word “rejected” and it is sorted in a different group from the remaining ballot papers towards a candidate hence it is clear that the intention of the drafters of the law is that rejected votes are not to be counted towards the computation of the election results. She submitted that paragraph 8 of Schedule 3 of the Constitution does not make provision for a third ballot and argued that Mr Wavel Ramkalawan was challenging section 34 of the Election Act and article 24 of the Constitution and this was not the proper way to do so. She maintained that the words “votes cast” bear the same meaning whether we are talking of National Assembly election or Presidential election or a Referendum.

Mr Basil Hoareau on behalf of Mr James Michel submitted that Article 24 and Article 113 of the Constitution does not give a citizen an unrestricted right to vote in whatever manner he or she wishes but the exercise of the right may be regulated by law as is necessary in a democratic society. The right to vote is restricted and must be exercised within the framework of the law, that is, the Elections Act. This means that if one does not exercise the right in accordance with the Election Act that ballot paper cannot be taken into account in determining the results of the Presidential Elections.

Relying on the PDM case Mr Hoareau submitted that the liberal meaning of “votes cast” must be read in the context of the principles of democracy which forms the basis of the Constitution and has effects on all other provisions of the Constitution. Accordingly the liberal meaning must advance the principles of democracy and not destroy it. Equating votes cast to total votes will have the effect of destroying the democratic process. The requirement to interpret the Constitution as a whole requires the maintenance of consistency between the provisions of the Constitution; the PDM case has already ruled that votes cast means valid votes in Schedule 4 and interpreting votes cast in Schedule 3 to mean anything other than valid votes would result in inconsistency.

Mr Hoareau insisted that paragraph 5 and 8 of Schedule 3 do not allow for any subsequent ballot following the second ballot and to interpret votes cast as total votes would put us at a constitutional impasse as our Constitution does not provide for a third ballot. If the provisions are interpreted in the way Mr Georges has argued then there is a possible scenario when elections will be held every 14 days, if neither party receives 50%, indefinitely. He supported the arguments of the Electoral Commission on section 34 of the Elections Act that rejected votes are separated and not counted.

In closing Mr Hoareau considered the question: When does a ballot paper become a vote? He submitted that a ballot paper only becomes a vote when the voter uses the ballot paper in accordance with the law and if failing that then the ballot paper remains a ballot paper and never becomes a vote.

The Honourable Attorney-General adopted the submissions made by the representatives of the Electoral Commission and Mr James Michel. He stated in addition that this Petition was frivolous and vexatious and should be struck out.

In reply to the arguments of the Electoral Commission, Mr James Michel and the Attorney-General, Mr Georges stated that the PDM case has not authoritatively stated that “votes cast” in Schedule 3 equals valid votes and reiterated that there is a distinction between Presidential and National Assembly elections. He maintained that the Constitution leaves open the possibility for subsequent ballots following the second ballot and if it intended to restrict the election to only two ballots it would have specifically said so.

The Court will give judgment together with the consolidated CP1/2016 “alleged irregularities” Petition.

The Court will reconvene tomorrow, Tuesday 16th February at 9 am to hear submission on the application by Mr Wavel Ramkalawan to call Mr James Michel on personal answers.

Legal note:

**Section 170 of the SCCP, Cap 213 restricts the contents of affidavits to “facts as the witness is able of his own knowledge to prove, except in interlocutory applications, on which statements as to his belief, with the grounds thereof, may be admitted.”

**Personal answers: section 163 allows a party who is desirous of obtaining the personal answers not upon oath of the adverse party to petition the Court exparte at any time prior to the day fixed for the hearing of the matter to obtain the attendance of such adverse party and the Court on sufficient ground being shown shall make an order granting the application or petition. And the party having obtained such order shall serve a summons, together with a copy of the order, on the adverse party to appear in court on the day stated.

Schedule 3, Paragraph 5. Subject to paragraphs 6 and 7, a person shall not be elected to the office of President unless he has received more than fifty percent of the votes in the election and the necessary number of ballots may, subject to the election being discontinued and recommenced in accordance with an Act, be held in accordance with the direction of the Electoral Commission to achieve that result.

Schedule 3, Paragraph 8.(1) Where in an election to the office of President three or more candidates take part in any ballot and no candidate receives more than fifty percent of the votes cast, then, if the result of the ballot is that -

(a) all the candidates receive the same number of votes;

(b) two or more candidates receive, equally, the highest number of votes;

(c) one candidate receives the highest number of votes and another candidate receives the second highest number of votes; or

(d) one candidate receives the highest number of votes and two or more candidates receive, equally, the second highest number of votes,

only the candidates referred to in subparagraph (a), subparagraph (b), subparagraph (c) or subparagraph (d), as the case may be, shall take part in the subsequent ballot and the other candidates, if any, shall be eliminated.

(2) Any subsequent ballots referred to in subparagraph (1) shall be held not less than seven days and not more than fourteen days after the immediately preceding ballot.

Elections Act, section 34. Counting.

(1) The Electoral Officer or the Designated Electoral Officer, as the case may be, shall in respect of an election or, where the Presidential Election and a National Assembly Election are held simultaneously in respect of each such election separately, in the presence of the candidates, if they are present, with the help of enumerators examine, count and record the number of ballot papers contained in each ballot box.

(2) Where a ballot paper—

(i)         does not bear the official mark referred to in section 25;

(ii)        has anything written or marked by which a voter can be identified;

(iii)       is mutilated or torn; or

(iv)       does not contain a clear indication of the candidate for whom the voter has voted,

the ballot paper, shall be rejected and shall be endorsed with the word “rejected” by the Electoral Officer or the Designated Electoral Officer, as the case may be, and if a candidate or a counting agent of a candidate who may be present objects to the decision of the Electoral Officer or the Designated Electoral Officer, as the case may be, also with the words “rejection objected to”.

(3) The ballot papers, other than those rejected under subsection (2), shall, in respect of an election or, where the Presidential Election and the National Assembly Election are held simultaneously, in respect of each such election separately, be thereafter sorted into different groups according to the indication of the candidate for whom the voter has voted, the ballot papers in each group shall be counted and the Electoral Officer or the Designated Electoral Officer, as the case may be, shall record the number of ballot papers in each group.

(4) The ballot papers shall be kept with their faces upwards while being counted and recorded.

(5) Subject to the decision of the court on an election petition, the decision of the Electoral Officer or Designated Electoral Officer, as the case may be, as to the question arising in respect of a ballot paper is final.

(6) The Electoral Officer or the Designated Electoral Officer, as the case may be, shall prepare a statement showing the number of ballot papers rejected under the following heads—

(a)        want of official stamp;

(b)        writing or mark by which a voter could be identified;

(c)        mutilated or torn;

(d)        absence of a clear indication of the candidate for whom the voter has voted,

and shall, on request, allow the candidate, if present, or the counting agent of each candidate, as may be present, to copy the statement.

http://www.seylii.org/content/15th-february-2016-election-petitions-summary-proceedings-special-rapporter


http://www.seylii.org/content/2016-election-petitions-information-public

Facebook Comment -
Thank you for Posting - A suggestions in our active days we would have gone to London contacted special solicitors and lawyers and seek their views and opinion and requested they follow the case/help us follow the case. The London NGO/Voluntry Sector has changed - the Conservative Justice System/impacts, maybe those of you in Australia, Canada, USA could do this - given the amount of EU tax Payers Money those on the continent who could adopt the same action - this is very very serious do not say afterwards there have been miscarriage of Justice when the possibilities are there and we do not make us of it. Specially the younger Generation. In Sechelles Seychelles when the High Parties get to know/made aware that in Canada, USA, Australia, South Africa - and Europe special interest group are monitoring and studying their argument, pleadings and rulings they will have to be much more careful - in our crazy young days would have even recruited some of the very best - it is very important and they would have oblige . Over the past 36 years of our nations workings we have never waited until they shout for help - we have taken and took the initiatives. What ever lies and terrible history history they have written the poor Seychellois know very little safe what the local media have written and the Seychelles TV. We have also lost some of them/they have departed.
Like · Reply · 28 mins · Edited

What about Mama Africa - we are taking of the Chair person of the African Union, she talk of democracy and Justice big - this is an instance where she can show us some action be they special lawyers for Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda, South Africa - Zambia who can help us monitor the case and it should be for free. We should be able to get the respective International media involved or TV - however one big critics - Mr Ralph Hoareau have urged that the combine Opposition comport like a Government in waiting - this means the ability to connect and communicate with those out of Seychelles the many Seychelloi and none Seychellois interested who care and support them - if need be raise funds for such action, this require a small team who can communicate outside of Seychelles meaning they can research list of serious Lawyers and specialist lawyers lobby them , email them and Facebook them and make them aware and the international media. If Seychelles refuse to help with the Finance - then will come a day of re conciliating. President Obama and ex President Clinton should help return a favor they ought to know what we are talking about.


Last edited by Sirop14 on Thu Feb 18, 2016 3:45 pm; edited 1 time in total

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Seychelles' court opens case on contested presidential election -

Post  Sirop14 on Mon Feb 15, 2016 7:08 pm

Seychelles' court opens case on contested presidential election - See more at: http://www.seychellesnewsagency.com/articles/4601/Seychelles'+court+opens+case+on+contested+presidential+election#sthash.YnicLGso.dpuf

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Petisyon kont rezilta eleksyon: Prokirer Zeneral pa pou sorti dan sa zafer

Post  Sirop14 on Tue Feb 16, 2016 12:08 pm

Petisyon kont rezilta eleksyon: Prokirer Zeneral pa pou sorti dan sa zafer

16-February-2016



Lakour Konstitisyonnel in deside ki Prokirer Zeneral Rony Govinden pou reste dan zafer petisyon kont rezilta dernyen eleksyon prezidansyel ki i pe ekoute an se moman; eleksyon kot Msye James Michel ti ganny deklare venker kont Msye Wavel Ramkalawan.
Dan sa petisyon, se Msye Ramkalawan ki’n anmenn Komisyonner Eleksyon, Prezidan Michel ek Prokirer Zeneral ankour akoz dapre li, Msye Michel pa ti’n devret ganny deklare prezidan akoz i pa’n ganny 50% vot ki Konstitisyon i demande. Son largiman se ki sa 50% i devret determinen par total dimoun ki’n vote, e non par lakantite vot ki’n ganny deklare konman valid. Petisyon pe osi sizere ki in annan iregilarite dan prosedir eleksyon.
Desizyon Lakour i kontrerman avek sa ki loter sa petisyon ti pe demande, setadir ki Prokirer Zeneral i ganny finalman tire dan sa zafer akoz i pa enparsyel. Sa i apre ki Msye Govinden ti’n dir ki i pou siport gouvernman ek Komisyon Eleksyon dan sa zafer, e ki in napa iregilarite dan eleksyon.
Avoka Bernard Georges ki pe reprezant Msye Ramkalawan, ti’n menm dir ki Msye Govinden ti’n fer sa deklarasyon avan menm ki levidans in ganny prezante avek Lakour.
Msye Georges ti’n osi dir ki Prokirer Zeneral i devret reprezant gouvernman oubyen Leta dan en fason endepandan, me ki i devret non-partizan e ki i pa devret siport lentere en endividi.
I ti’n azoute ki fodre pa ki Msye Govinden i konfiz Prezidan Michel ek gouvernman, akoz zot de keksoz diferan.
Dan en lesanz enteresan ant le de avoka, Msye Govinden ti reponn ki sa aplikasyon pa ti baze lo okenn pwen lalwa e ki i pa ti pe byen enterpret Konstitisyon lo rol, drwa ek privilez Prokirer Zeneral.
I ti azoute ki i kapab pran en pozisyon baze lo lalwa ek fe, e ki dan ka sa petisyon, i ti’n regard tou bann fe avan pran en desizyon.
I ti’n konklir ki pour li, ti napa iregilarite dan lafason ki Komisyon Eleksyon in kont bann vot.
Dan desizyon ki i ti lir yer, Sef Ziz Mathilda Twomey ti dir ki Prokirer Zeneral i ganny apwente par gouvernman anba Konstitisyon, ki i konseye prensipal gouvernman e ki i reprezant bann prensip gouvernman.
I ti azoute ki i kanmenm annan son lotonomi politikman e ki sa i permet li donn gouvernman konsey legal.
Ziz Twomey ti donk konklir ki Prokirer Zeneral i en parti mandatwar dan sa zafer e ki i pa ti pou apropriye pour retir li ladan.
I ti azoute ki i prezimen ki Msye Govinden pou met devan zentere son biro ki i pe reprezante.
Sepandan, Madanm Twomey ti averti li ki i devret pran en pozisyon endepandan dan sa zafer, e ki i bezwen disteng lentere gouvernman avek lentere prezidan.
Sa apre ki i ti’n deklare ki Msye Govinden ti’n annan tor pour form en lopinyon, donk pour dir ki ti napa iregilarite dan prosedir eleksyon.
Yer, Lakour Konstitisyonnel ti osi ekout largiman tou le de kote lo si Prezidan Michel ti ganny plis ki 50% vot dan dernyen eleksyon, parey konstitisyon i demande, pour li kapab ganny elekte legalman. Sa i depan lo si Lakour i deside si Komisyon Eleksyon i devret determin sa 50% lo tou vot ki’n ganny met dan bwat vote, ouswa lo zis bann ki valid.
Lakour pou anons son desizyon en pe plitar.


Seychelles Nation

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

State-of-the-nation address today

Post  Sirop14 on Tue Feb 16, 2016 12:42 pm

State-of-the-nation address today

16-February-2016
President Michel

President James Michel will deliver his nationwide year 2016 State-of-the-nation address to the National Assembly today.
The event, which will mark the National Assembly’s first sitting for the first term of 2016, will start at 5pm and will be broadcast live on SBC radio and television.
It is a constitutional requirement that the head of state delivers a state-of-the nation address on the occasion of the first National Assembly sitting each year.
After the address, the Assembly will adjourn until Friday February 19 at 9am when leaders from both sides of the house – leader of the opposition David Pierre and leader of government business Marie-Antoinette Rose – will give their replies to the address.
The other members will also give their reply to the address during the three days of debate.

http://www.nation.sc/article.html?id=248432

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

State of the Nation Address by President James Alix Michel, 16th February, 2016

Post  Sirop14 on Tue Feb 16, 2016 10:29 pm

State of the Nation Address by President James Alix Michel, 16th February, 2016

Tue, 16 February 2016

94 90 1
Mr Speaker

President Mancham

Vice-President

President of the Court of Appeal

Chief Justice

Designated Minister

Ministers

Leader of Government Business in the National Assembly

Leader of the Opposition in the National Assembly

Members of the National Assembly

Excellencies

Invited Guests

People of Seychelles

Over the last 12 years, every year, almost always around the same time, I have come before this National Assembly, I have come before the people of Seychelles, to give you an account of the State of our Nation. I shall also share with you my plan for the future, and share with you certain other reflections.

I represent a party that has struggled for more than 50 years for the liberation, freedom, dignity and emancipation of all Seychellois. We fought for social justice, for equality, for fraternity, for unity. And we’ve taken the Seychellois nation far – very far – over the 38 years that we have been in power.

In December 2015 the Seychellois people once again chose me and Parti Lepep to lead our country. They elected me to continue working for them. Today I come before this Assembly with a renewed mandate. A third and final mandate as President, which the people have entrusted me with. A responsibility, a challenge I have accepted.

In the context of this new mandate, the time has come for me to deliver an address on the state of the nation, as Article 65 of the Constitution of the Republic of Seychelles requires me to do.

I do it with honesty, without exaggeration, without hiding facts, with a sense of responsibility and confidence in the future of Seychelles. This year is no exception, even if some had wished – and continue to wish – that it wasn’t me who is standing before you today.

I am sorry to disappoint these people. Maybe their chance, their turn, will come one day. But meanwhile they must accept the will of the Seychellois people. They must accept a government that the Seychellois people have elected. Not a government elected on Facebook or other social media. But a true government elected freely, democratically and constitutionally. A Parti Lepep government, for the people. I want to reassure you that notwithstanding all this, we will continue to work for you, for all Seychellois. Without demolishing what has taken us many years to build, together, by the sweat of our brows. We will continue working to build an even better Seychelles. Encompassing change, because it is we, Parti Lepep – and always we – who have brought about real change in this country. And we shall always do it when necessary. With respect to our fellow citizens. In peace and unity. In dignity. With fraternity and compassion. Without hatred and without the desire for revenge. Without personal agendas. Without JCBs, without bulldozers. Without arson. Without stamping on anyone.

Mr Speaker

People of Seychelles

It is not my intention this year to present a detailed account on everything that my government has accomplished in 2015. The entire nation knows very well what we have achieved up to now. The results are there for all to see and appreciate. And understand, for those who wish to understand.

I will, first of all, talk about the things I said I would do in the first 100 days of my new mandate as well as what I intend doing this year.

But before I address these, I want to state certain facts and other figures which show clearly that our country, our nation, has continued to make progress - a lot of progress – in 2015. That the state of our nation is very stable.

In 2015:

• We recorded a growth rate of 4.34%.

• Our foreign exchange reserve in the Central Bank was US$536M. This represents almost five months worth of importation. You will recall that in 2008 our foreign exchange reserves represented only one week of imports.

• We continued to service our external debt regularly, and reduce our debt stock to 62% of our Gross National Product (GNP). We remain well on track to achieving our public debt reduction objective of 50% of GNP in 2018. A level which many European countries have not been able to reach.

• We continued to maintain our fiscal discipline, which remains a key element of our strategy to improve our economy.

• The rate of inflation was 3.2% at the end of 2015. This is a good indicator of economic stability.

• The tourism industry experienced considerable growth, with a 19% increase in visitor arrivals, and a 17% increase in revenue.

• Approximately 40,000 Seychellois travelled overseas last year, which represents 44% of Seychelles’ population.

• Air Seychelles continued to perform very well, especially with the increase in the number of flights to certain destinations and the opening of new routes, a strategy which it will maintain this year. The newly launched direct flight between Seychelles and China demonstrates the success of this strategy.

• The overall contribution of the tuna industry to our economy is about 10%.

• Seychellois seized the opportunities offered by the Blue Economy, and have started new fishing business ventures.

• In support of this sector, government will offer photovoltaic panels to all entrepreneurs interested in investing in ice-making plants that use this technology.

• Entrepreneurs in the fishing and agricultural sectors benefit from tax concessions on equipment they import for their businesses.

• Government continued providing support to the agricultural sector, mainly through the National Agricultural Investment Plan; through an insurance scheme for farmers, increased stock of supplies in requisite stores, easing of procedures for leasing agricultural land from government, diversification and commercialization of agricultural production, and other facilities.

• We continued, and intensified, our policy and strategy of empowerment and ownership. As a result:

We have placed 1,612 people in employment;
Unemployment rate was at 4.2%;
Up to December 2015 a total of 538 loans valued at SR507.3M were approved under the small and medium enterprise (SME) scheme;
A total of 117 new small businesses were created, and this brings the number of small and medium enterprises in Seychelles to 2,290;
The micro-enterprise centre at Providence is already operational and 59 small entrepreneurs have been allocated workshop space there.
• More than 270 Seychellois obtained university degrees either from the University of Seychelles, or from universities overseas.

• In the context of our policy of promoting ownership, 77 families received the keys to their own homes in 2015. Another 85 were offered plots of land. This year we will make available another 277 houses to Seychellois families. Statistics show that today, approximately 75% of Seychellois families are owners of their homes.

• Seychellois purchasing power has increased, mainly as a result of the reduction in the cost of fuel, electricity, water, LPG gas and certain goods. This year we will increase the purchasing power even more through measures I will talk about later.

• The STC hypermarket has opened its doors and is offering all Seychellois more choice in goods and commodities, and at affordable prices. The days of “napa” (don’t have) are no more and will never return under my government.

• Finally, Seychelles’ role on the international scene, our image and our visibility, was reinforced and recognised.

All this – and much more that I have not mentioned – shows clearly that we are living in a Seychelles that is becoming increasingly prosperous.

And now, before I proceed to the second part of my address, I would like to share a small reflection with you.

During their electoral campaign and after, and till today, the opposition and their supporters and allies – local and abroad – have made all sorts of accusations, lies, allegations and calumny against me and the Parti Lepep government in their newspapers and on social media. There is nothing that they have not said. That we are corrupt. That we do not have direction. That government does not know how to do business. That people are becoming poorer. That we are condoning drug abuse and drug trafficking in the country.

Let me answer them.

Can a country with a corrupt government be ranked 40th on a list of 167 states surveyed annually by Transparency International?

If we were corrupt, as those in the opposition are claiming, would we continue to receive assistance from the European Union, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and other international agencies and certain countries?

Can a government which lacks direction and cannot promote the environment and facilities for doing business be ranked 95th, among 189 countries, by the World Bank in its ease-of-doing-business report? I have always said: Government is not in the business of doing business. We create the environment for doing business. We create the opportunities for the private sector to do business. And the private sector remains a privileged and necessary partner of government.

Can a country where the population is allegedly living in abject poverty occupy the 64th position on a list of 188 countries on the United Nations Human Development Index?

Is it possible for such a country – where poverty reigns, where there is shortage of everything – to be considered a nation of high human development by the United Nations, and one of high income by the World Bank?

Is a country of abject poverty one where 75% of its population are owners of their own homes, are guaranteed a pension, have access to free education, free health care, and can even be sent overseas for medical treatment?

Judge for yourselves! I did not invent these rankings. The findings come from these international organizations. Is it because they like the Parti Lepep government that they have decided to bestow the good rankings on Seychelles? Having said this, I believe that our results, our rankings, could have been better, higher, if our official statistics were up to date. There is an absolute necessity for all government departments to make a greater effort, and to do better at ensuring that we collect the required figures and statistics for submission to international organizations.

I will come back to the drug issue later in my speech.

Mr Speaker,

Dear compatriots,

In the last election Seychellois chose to rally under the banner of TOGETHER and rejected the call to trample others. Can a human being possess so much hatred in the heart so as to knock others to the floor, trample on them, and crush them? Can a politician who claims to be a responsible person and have the interest of Seychellois at heart support and tolerate such a thing? How can you teach your child to sing songs of hatred and violence?

Seychellois have confirmed, through the choice they made, that the Parti Lepep manifesto represents the best chance, the best opportunity, for the future of Seychelles. This is the manifesto that will guide me and my government during the next five years.

I’ve talked a lot about it during my electoral campaign and also when I was sworn in on 20th December last year. I also mentioned the priorities I want to accomplish during the first 100 days of my new mandate. I’ve never made false promises to the people. I have always kept my commitments. And here is the status of implementation of these priorities.

1. Pension increases: In December 2015 the colonial pension for former employees of government prior to 1979 was increased by SR500. Also in December 2015 we increased by SR500 the special public sector pension payable to past government employees who had not qualified for a colonial pension system were not entitled to a pension under Seychelles Pension Fund law today. In January 2016 we increased the social security pension, for citizens reaching the age of 63 years, by another SR500, to reach SR3,600 a month.

2. Invalidity benefits: As from 1st January, we increased invalidity benefits from SR2,430 to SR3,450 per month. This is now equivalent to the present net minimum salary.

3. Higher maximum salary level for housing improvement loan consideration: The maximum monthly salary level for qualification for housing improvement loan has increased from SR8,000 to SR15,000. This is already effective.

4. Higher maximum salary level for a housing loan from Housing Finance Company (HFC): The maximum monthly salary to qualify for a housing loan has been increased from SR25,000 to SR30,000. This measure took effect as from 1st January.

5. Increase in housing loan: The maximum amount of loan an applicant could receive under this scheme was SR750,000. As from 1st January the maximum housing loan was increased to SR850,000.

6. Loans for renovation and repair of pensioners’ homes: A person who is 63 years and older, and is the owner of his/her home, can now apply for up to SR50,000 for renovation or repair works on the house. The home owner can also get a loan of up to SR100,000 for re-roofing. These special loans carry no interest. Furthermore, government will subsidise by 25% all loans to pensioners under this scheme. This means that when a pensioner decides, for example, to take a loan of SR100,000 to repair their house, they will have only SR75,000 to repay, and no interest.

7. 13th month salary: Public sector employees who are not on contract were paid their 13th month salary by 14th January. We believe that it is absolutely fair that private sector workers also receive the 13th month salary. We will introduce legislation for the private sector to follow our example. The aim is to encourage productivity and improve services, and also distribute more of the wealth and welfare with the workers, acquired through policies put in place by the government.

8. New gratuity scheme for public sector employees: Government has effected increases in the gratuities it pays its employees. This took effect from 1st January.

9. Payment of gratuity and compensation to former defence forces members: We have provided for the payment of a gratuity of SR8,000 to 808 former members – and in certain cases their heirs – of the defence forces who left the SPDF before 2007, and to 150 who are actually in service. This is because they did not benefit from the change of scheme of service. Payment of gratuity is being made, to be followed thereafter by payment of compensation.

10. Ex-gratia payment for former RFA servicemen: As from 10th February, more than 200 ex-servicemen of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) began the procedures to receive their ex-gratia compensation of SR20,000 each. One thousand rupees from each payment is going to their association. Negotiations with the British government to compensate the Seychellois ex-servicemen have taken several years, and have not yielded any result. Last year the Government of Seychelles took a decision to compensate them, because they deserve the payment for the services they rendered. We are implementing it will cost us more than SR4 million.

11. "My First Job" Scheme: This programme was launched on 11th January. Of the 863 young people who completed their secondary education, 778 have registered under the programme. 77 of them have already found employment through this programme. 172 employers are already associated with the My First Job programme. This high level of participation is already a good indicator of its success.

12. Housing allowance for university graduates: The allowance has increased from SR3,000 to SR4,000 monthly. The duration of payment has also been extended by two years. This took effect on 1st January.

13. Allowance for post-secondary students in private post-secondary institutions: As from 1st January, Seychellois students in private post-secondary educational establishments are entitled to the same allowances as their colleagues in corresponding state institutions. The allowances vary between SR850 a month for first post-secondary year to SR1,050 monthly for the final post-secondary year.

14. Laptop scheme: Effective 1st January, S4 students are also covered by the programme, which previously targeted only S5 and post-secondary students. Potentially several hundred students can avail of the opportunity offered by this programme.

15. Free specialised medical services for all Seychellois: Since the start of this year, patients who are referred by private doctors to specialized services at the Seychelles Hospital have access to such facilities free of charge.

16. Renewable energy: The renewable energy democratization scheme was launched early this year, and the tenders have been invited for the installation of photovoltaic panels on a priority basis. This will help reduce the cost of electricity to consumers. We hope that all houses will eventually be able to benefit from such a project. The installation of solar panels for water heating is also ongoing. The Seychelles Energy Commission is facilitating this project. The Commission will give training to technicians for the installation and maintenance of these solar panels. For both projects, Government will assist consumers to get access to credit for the purchase and installation of the panels, and offer loan guarantees.

17. Non-governmental organizations: During the first 100 days of my new mandate, Government will introduce a Civil Society Small Grant programme. The objective is to help civil society bodies implement small projects beneficial to the public.

18. Audit of Ministries and Departments: As part of the commitment to improved service delivery, including increased efficiency and government performance, I demanded an audit of all government ministries and departments. This exercise is underway presently and is being led by the ministers themselves. I will come back to this question of service delivery later in my address.

19. Communication and the need to remain connected with the people: I have always insisted on the need for leaders – at all levels – to remain connected with the people. Where communication is concerned, government remains, unfortunately, its own worst enemy. We do not communicate enough with the public. We allow the opposition to spread all sorts of propaganda, allegations, lies, and so on, without reaction on our part. This will stop. All ministers will open an official account on social media. This will allow members of the public to contact them and make known their concern and suggestions. This is linked to service delivery and is among my priorities for the first 100 days of my mandate.

Mr Speaker,

Dear Seychellois people,

We said we would do it. We have done almost all that we said we would do in the first 100 days of my new mandate. We have 41 more days left; and only one or two things remain to be finished. I will do it. I am delivering on my promises.

But that is not all. There are many other issues, many priorities, for me and my government to tackle. These call for firm decisions and urgent attention. I will mention some.

Firstly, there is the question of drug abuse and drug trafficking.

Certain factions in the opposition accuse me and Parti Lepep Government of tolerating the importation, trafficking and consumption of drugs in the country. They make cheap politics by taking advantage of the suffering of parents whose children are into drugs.

They forget – conveniently – the quantity of drugs that has been seized during the past five years. They forget – deliberately – how many drug traffickers have been convicted. I will remind them of the figures. The amount of drugs the NDEA and the police have seized during the past five years is valued at SR339.45M. During the same period 71 individuals were convicted for drug trafficking. 65 of them are serving their sentences on Marie-Louise. 72 others linked to drug offences are awaiting the completion of their trials. During the five years we have seized SR20M worth of assets which belonged to traffickers. Presently there are several cases in court concerning assets suspected of being the proceeds of crime. The assets are worth millions of rupees. This year we are putting more emphasis on the application of the Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA) – legislation under which suspected drug traffickers are required to justify the source of their assets, failing which the State will confiscate the assets. Actually, the FIU in collaboration with NDEA and the police are taking action against eight individuals under this law. All illegally acquired assets will be seized under this law.

I will intensify the fight against drug abuse and trafficking during my new mandate. It is a fight which requires much effort, vigilance, resources and education. I am, during the short term, taking the following actions:

• Intensification of medical treatment and detoxification programme for addicts;

• A programme of clean needles for addicts, used under medical supervision;

• Intensification of our programme of rehabilitation for young people caught in possession of drugs. This will be done mainly through community services, the strengthening of services and facilities offered at the Praslin and Coëtivy centres, and the creation of a Drop-in Centre on Mahé, a facility which will allow addicts to make a new start in life in an appropriate environment and with the necessary professional support;

• Amendment of the laws on drugs to cater for these new considerations, and among others,

To allow judges and magistrates complete discretion when passing sentence after drug related conviction;
The setting up of a special court to hear all drug offences;
The Introduction of a different regime/programme for those caught with certain amounts and types of drug, for personal consumption;
A proposal, to be presented to Indian Ocean Commission Ministers when they meet later this month, to establish a high-level regional structure for intelligence gathering, coordination and operations in the fight against drug trafficking.
It is time to stop politicizing this problem and find solutions and assistance for the victims of this scourge. The drug problem is not mine or the government’s alone. It is a problem of society. We have to be honest with ourselves. Let us give a helping hand to give a decisive blow to this social ill once and for all.

Fighting drugs also involves more activities in the districts and at community level, mainly through sports, the arts and culture. Our youth will invest their energy and talents in safe, productive and innovative ways.

The Parti Lepep government gives a lot of importance to community development. I have always placed much emphasis on a local governance approach, whereby residents are able to participate proactively in addressing issues and challenges in the districts. Local governance will be strengthened soon with the introduction of district councils. This will bolster our system of democracy. The councils will serve as a platform to enable residents to come forward, participate and be part of decision-making. This will also boost relations between the central government and the districts. As a result the service delivery system at district level will be more effective, and we hope it will meet the levels of expectation and satisfaction of residents. In the meantime, government this year has earmarked SR30M for the implementation of small projects in districts. With the increasing focus on early childhood, much work is being undertaken to build day care centres in several districts in order to help families, especially mothers. We shall also create a fund to encourage even greater development of talent in arts, sports and culture.

Another priority which my government is continually addressing is the disparity in the standard of living which exists in our society. Once again, the opposition has politicized this issue, without making any realistic proposal to address it. This is their habit. They talk and write about poverty which, according to them, exists everywhere in Seychelles. They describe Seychelles as a country of abject poverty. But they never talk about the big houses they live in on their large properties, the big cars they drive, their luxury boats. They never talk about the social programmes in place to help the most vulnerable people.

We have to be realistic and face the problem, without demagoguery. And bring realistic solutions which our budget and revenue will support. I do not wish to compare us with other countries of the world, because the notion of poverty is relative. But I do recognize that poverty exists in certain sectors of our society. My task during the next five years is to continue narrowing the gap and raise the standard and quality of life of the Seychellois, especially the most in need. We are already doing this, through, for example:

• Increase in pension and social security;

• Minimum wage revision;

• Revision of benefits and assistance from the Agency for Social Protection;

• Subvention for day-care;

• Special interest-free loans for pensioners to repair their houses;

• Carer assistance;

• Stabilisation, and where possible, reduction of prices of basic commodities and other essential goods through STC;

• Stabilisation and – depending on the situation on the international market – reduction of the costs of consumption of electricity and water, LPG gas, and so on.

My government will continue to do even more. Because we’ve always had the interest of all Seychellois at heart. And it is never our intention to leave anyone behind. This year I will introduce a series of measures which will contribute to even greater improvement in the standard of living of a significant number of Seychellois families. These include:

• Increase in minimum salary for a 35-hour week, from SR4050 to SR5050 monthly. There will be no personal income tax deduction on the minimum salary. This measure will take effect in April.

• Also in April, we will increase the retirement/social security pension, to SR5050, which is equivalent to the minimum salary.

• Revision of the conditions and criteria for welfare assistance, in order to give the Agency for Social Protection more flexibility when deciding the amount of help to give to people in difficulties;

• Creation of a special fund to continue supporting our people who have physical or mental disabilities, to empower them to also live a life of dignity in spite of their disabilities;

• Recognising the need to support the most vulnerable families who do not have the means to take a loan on their own, government is foreseeing the creation of a special fund for the renovation of homes which are in poor conditions and which represent a risk to families residing in the houses;

• Free transport for patients from Praslin and La Digue who have to follow specialized medical treatment at Seychelles Hospital;

• Two boat tickets per month for all post-secondary students from Praslin and La Digue who are attending school on Mahé;

• Subsidised boat and place tickets for all pensioners travelling between Mahé, Praslin and La Digue;

• Revision of VAT on certain products and commodities;

Introduction of a more equitable and fairer tax system. We will introduce a progressive tax system whereby low income earners will either not pay any tax at all or pay less than they do now. The progressive tax system will take effect in January 2017.
As part of the tax system reform, which will also allow Seychellois to have more money in their pockets, as from July this year all those earning less than SR8,555.50 a month will not pay any tax at all. This is the first stage in our comprehensive reform of the tax system, which will come fully into effect in January 2017, whereby all Seychellois will no longer pay tax on the first SR8,555.50 of their salary.
At the same, an audit which the Ministry responsible for Finance is undertaking will determine if there have been any tax evasion in certain sectors, and how Government can maximise its revenues. Any tax revenue we can recover after this exercise will be re-invested in the social sector.
The measures which government continues to introduce in order to reduce poverty in the society must be accompanied by a real determination on the part of those concerned to strive and earn a living. They have to reduce their dependence on the state. We all have to, as individuals, as responsible citizens, take our responsibilities.

Sometimes there are certain attitudes and behaviours that hinder us from setting correct priorities. We should ask ourselves what is more essential in our lives and the lives of our families? The manner in which we spend our money can also contribute to creating poverty.

Where there is real poverty, where people are vulnerable, the government and Parti Lepep are there to help. It is easy to criticise government. This government which is helping many. It is easy for some to shout that they want change, without realising what type of change they need to improve their own lives. Do they realize that changing the Parti Lepep government will not bring any solution to their lives if they do not change their own mentalities? Let us stop looking for excuses for our own personal weaknesses and the situation we have put ourselves in. Once again, let us stop the demagoguery with poverty, and let each one of us take our responsibilities. Those who talk loudest about the issue of poverty in Seychelles – they are the ones with the biggest businesses, the biggest properties. They are a lot more fortunate. My honest advice to them is to not only talk about poverty, but to also do something concrete to improve the lives for their compatriots who, according to them, are living in poverty.

Another of my priorities is improvement in the service which the public sector delivers. In spite of several reforms, in spite of certain progress, public disappointment and lack of satisfaction with service delivery remain a big concern. Most civil servants are doing their work properly, with devotion and a heart for Seychellois. But there are others who spend their time only to cause frustration among the public through various manoeuvres and bureaucratic procedures. There are even some among them – the so-called technocrats – who are hostile towards the system. They are doing everything to boycott the government that employs them. One would think they are opposition agents disguised as technocrats. They send you round in circles when you make an application, when you seek an appointment, when you want to make a complaint, when you want to put forward a suggestion. And when they are disciplined they cry “political victimization”!

As for me, it does not interest me which political party you belong to, it does not matter which religion you belong to. What interests me is that you do your work, you do the work you have been appointed to do well. What interests me is your output, your productivity, the way you treat members of the public. What interests me is that all Seychellois, without distinction, receive the same good quality of service and treatment. What interests me is your loyalty towards this government which has been elected by the people. If you cannot respect these criteria, you have no place in the public service.

In the past we talked a lot about our health system, and the service that Seychellois receive.

We are facing enormous challenges – like most countries in the world – such as cases of hepatitis, HIV-SIDA, and diseases, both communicable and non-communicable. It is a continuous struggle, a battle that we must win. We have to persevere, together, to eliminate these diseases, and negative lifestyles that cause them, and allocate more resources for their prevention and treatment.

Seychelles Hospital possesses equipment that is among the most modern and most sophisticated in the region. Equipment we either received as donations or purchased by Government. But equipment alone means little, if there is a lack of will, a lack of competence and expertise to use the equipment well. The best equipment is practically worthless if the doctors, nurses and other medical professionals do not have the passion, the compassion, the will, to offer the best service to their patients. And patients, on their part, lose confidence in the health system. Everyday there are one or two who write to State House asking to be sent overseas for a second medical opinion.

Don't get me wrong. Most doctors, nurses and other medical professionals are delivering a good service, often in situations and conditions that are difficult. But there are serious weaknesses in our health system. Particularly where attitude is concerned. Attitude that is not professional at all. Arrogance. Lack of compassion. Lack of responsibility. Lack of planning. Wastage of resources.

Many have forgotten that their roles and responsibilities are to save lives. Their priority preoccupation seems to be to advance their political and personal agendas. Frustrate people, and then blame Government!

• Is it acceptable for a person to wait for several weeks or even months to get an appointment with a specialist? And when finally they receive the appointment, they have to wait for many more hours to see the specialist? How many times have we heard the complaints and murmurs of our people who have been sitting at the Yellow Roof since morning to see a specialist? Yet, when it concerns our families, when it concerns certain people, they get the fastest and most efficient service possible.

• Is it acceptable for laboratory results to continuously get lost and mixed up?

• Is it acceptable for stocks of dialysis equipment and medicines, which have cost millions of rupees, to go to waste without ever being used? And nobody asks questions? Where is the planning? Is there something underhand going on? And when there is a shortage of medicines because of poor management and bad planning, we have to bring in new supplies by air, costing us even more. Who has to pay for this? It is the people. We have to pay. Can we tolerate this?

• Is it acceptable for those young Seychellois doctors who have been selected for specialization to wait for so long before proceeding on overseas training? Especially when the funding and scholarships are there.

• Is it acceptable for an ambulance that has been in an accident to be waiting endlessly for repairs? Where is the supervision? Where is the discipline?

The situation is critical, and dealing with such a situation requires serious measures. An audit in the different health departments has revealed serious deficiencies which must be addressed quickly. Let me begin with outsourcing of the diagnostic and laboratory services. We have done this for the dialysis centre, and with great success in spite of considerable resistance. I am persuaded that this approach and strategy of gradually outsourcing certain essential services will bring a huge improvement in our health service delivery, and benefit all Seychellois.

I have spoken about Health. But there is another Ministry where there are serious problems. That is the Ministry of Education. It has problems at the level of planning, supervision, discipline, human resources, equipment, maintenance, disappointing school results and student performance, and so on. But the main challenge is to ensure that children and students perform at their highest level, and obtain the best results that correspond to the needs and expectations of the New Seychelles. Schools form part of the community, and parents remain the first educators of their children – first and foremost. Another challenge is teacher retention, and to maintain and improve the infrastructure of our schools. I shall deal with the deficiencies of our education system whilst also addressing the problems in the health sector. This is also a priority in my new mandate.

Mr Speaker,

Dear Seychellois people,

Housing will continue to remain a priority for me and my government in the years ahead. Our effort in the housing sector will not only continue but will also intensify. Our long-term objective is to enable each Seychellois family to own its house.

This year 277 Seychellois families will be given the keys to their new homes. In addition, work will start this year on 68 residential units in different areas of Mahé, Praslin and La Digue. We also have plans to begin construction of 72 new units at Perseverance and allocate plots of land on Île Aurore for more housing units.

We will make available 131 plots of land on Mahé, Praslin and La Digue to Seychellois families.

In 2005 government introduced the Home Ownership Scheme which enabled many Seychellois families to become owners of their homes faster. The success of the scheme is evident in the number of Seychellois families who are today owners of their own homes.

Over the past 10 years government has continued to invest in the housing programme, and my government now believes that the time has come to enable other families that are not benefiting to also become owners of their homes as fast as possible. My government has decided to offer a reduction of 25% on the price of the house to those who are on a house purchase agreement with the Property Management Company (PMC).

Other people who are renting houses from PMC and who wish to join the house purchase agreement, will also enjoy this 25% reduction.

Other PMC tenants who do not wish to join the House Purchase Agreement scheme, and who are on the minimum wage, will receive a contribution from the Agency for Social Protection to meet 50% of their rent.

My government remains sincere and committed towards its policy of encouraging all Seychellois families to become owners of their houses.

We are also intensifying repair works in housing estates, and the reconstruction of estates where necessary, such as at Pointe Larue and Baie Lazare.

This year 14 graduate families and young professionals will take ownership of their apartments in a condominium block at Anse Déjeuner.

The condominium project at Île Perseverance will offer more opportunities this year and in the years ahead. In addition, we are putting at the disposal of our professionals 70 plots of land at Perseverance under the self-build scheme.

Finally, people who are buying a house or a plot of land for the first time, will not have to pay stamp duty on the first SR2M.

We will continue to actively encourage the private sector to enter into partnership with Government to build houses for sale or rent at reasonable prices.

Once again I call on everyone to take their responsibilities and obligations seriously concerning their loan repayments, and also to put money aside for their own houses in the future.

Mr Speaker,

Allow me now to touch a question which concerns the National Assembly members directly, and also ministers in my government.

During my election campaigning, during the visits I made, during the meetings I had with members of the public, one of the issues that came up often was that of the pension of the National Assembly members. Seychellois are asking why a former member of the Assembly who has not reached the age of retirement, should be receiving a pension after, let’s say, only one or two terms.

We, the Parti Lepep government, follow the principles that have always inspired and sustained us. We lead by example. It is for this reason that at the Cabinet meeting at the start of this year, we took the decision that neither the President, nor the Vice-President, nor the Ministers will take their end-of-term gratuities this year.

Our principles are guided by the voice and the will of the people. I have listened to the people. As a result I am proposing that no member of the National Assembly, past or present, who has not reached the national retirement age will receive the pension.

Their pensions and all their benefits will be paid when they reach the retirement age.

The same principle applies to the ministers. No minister, past and present, will be paid the pension until upon reaching the retirement age defined by law.

Government will table an amendment proposal to the National Assembly soon to establish the new conditions and procedures for the pensions of National Assembly members and Ministers. I count on your support for this initiative. Thank you in advance.

Mr Speaker,

Dear people of Seychelles,

There are many other laws which the National Assembly has to consider, including certain regulations in our criminal code which are of no relevance today.

One of them is the law introduced by the British in 1955 to criminalise homosexuality. Although this law is not enforced these days, it remains part of our legal system. This is an aberration. Seychelles is a society that has always been tolerant, where we respect divergent views and where we live in peace with everyone. We are not a homophobic society. Moreover, the Constitution of the Republic of Seychelles guarantees the protection of all citizens, without discrimination. We also have a United Nations human rights obligation, since 2011, to abolish all provisions in our laws that criminalise homosexuality between consenting adults. As a secular and democratic nation, Seychelles has to fulfill its national, international and constitutional obligations. I have listened and I have consulted. My government has decided to repeal the law. We are submitting a bill to the National Assembly for your consideration.

There are other articles in the Constitution we are going to amend, based on certain recommendations which the Constitutional Review Committee made in 2009. Some recommendations have already been implemented. There are also certain other laws which need to be amended and new ones to be introduced. Whilst we are committed to these reforms, it may take some time to accomplish them all because of our human resource limitations.

However, there is one bill of law we wish to bring before the National Assembly immediately.

This is legislation for the establishment of a commission against corruption. The commission will have powers to investigate, detect and prevent practices linked to corruption. It will also receive complaints against corruption and record investigations into allegations of practices linked to corruption in all government departments and all institutions which get funding and donations from government. We have no lessons to learn from anyone on anti-corruption. We have taken harsh measures where corruption existed. The commission which we are setting up will help us strengthen our actions against corruption.

Mr Speaker,

Dear Seychellois People,

The last elections have made many Seychellois question the way the President of the Republic is elected. There is actually an interesting debate on this issue. A question Seychellois are asking themselves: Is it normal and acceptable for an insignificant party, which pulled only 400 votes, to decide the future of the country for promises and the trading of ministerial posts? This to me is real auction – and this is probably what the leader of SNP was referring to the night he lost the election.

Another issue we have to consider in our evolving democracy, is the number of consecutive mandates that a President of the Republic can serve. After a lot of reflection and consultation, my government and I have decided to propose to the National Assembly that the President will serve only two consecutive five-year terms, and not three as it is now.

I want to make it clear that neither I, nor the Vice President, nor the ministers we have appointed, wish to cling on to power. The things we care about most are the welfare, freedom, prosperity and unity of the Seychellois people. It is the people – and only the people – who will decide their future.

Mr Speaker,

Dear Seychellois People,

38 years in power. A record that many envy. A record of accomplishments that continues to inspire all Seychellois. Parti Lepep has taken us far. We have undertaken economic, social and cultural reforms. Parti Lepep has given the Seychellois people a true national identity. We have given the Seychellois the true sense of pride. Patriotism. We have undertaken many reforms to take us where we are today. Unfortunately, some of the reforms have inflated ambitions for power. For many their memories are short. Certain mentalities which we fought to eliminate are resurfacing. Many who are today living in opulence have forgotten their roots. The true force of the people remains within the Seychellois who recognize where they come from and appreciate where they are going.

It cost me dearly to bring order, to fight greed and corruption. To bring peace and stability in our country. But I did it because I stuck to my principles. I believe in the principles of Parti Lepep.

In the last elections we faced five political opponents and different forces, local and exterior. Alone, we, Parti Lepep stood against all of them and emerged victorious. It was a fierce battle, against several forces. But we stood our ground. And yes, the elected government of this country is a Parti Lepep government.

But I recognize there is a lot of work to do to go back to the people who were misled by false promises.

This year we shall be celebrating the 40th anniversary of our Independence. If we have reached where we are today, it is thanks to our determination and our conviction that, within us Seychellois, we have the courage to stand up and do what is right for our Seychelles. We have done it TOGETHER. Now my call as the President of Seychelles is for us all to rally together to consolidate our unity, to preserve our stability and to continue to make the Seychelles that we love remain that country of peace and unity in the world.

Today I give you the assurance that this Parti Lepep government will continue to work for all Seychellois. For our wellbeing, our prosperity and the progress of our country.

Thank you. And may God continue to protect our Seychelles.

http://www.statehouse.gov.sc/speeches.php?news_id=2995

Comment Facebook -
We are bad with microphone would rather let a pig or cow or dog talk/use the microphone - because if we did, have allowed those who judge they can better use a microphone - For 25 years the SPUP/SPPF/PL, they have embarked on a very dishonest approach extract/cream,/siphoned off, there are other legal terminologies or scientific, or Criminal terminology - the contents of that SIROP program to rethink their politic, economic workings, Social agenda and international diplomatic workings ( a very long list of governments and politicians involved in this practice) - then turn round and say I thought these out and worked them with my advisers and experts and ministers. He is promising a Corruption Committee what freedom with they have - if we were to address them what has been going on the past 25 years. By now those who have given some thoughts and studied our issues, that SIROP program and our EU Portal workings and began to add/sum up. Very few dared address them. Not once a thank you.

Having said we watched /followed and monitored with many other the 2015 Presidential in Berlin/East Germany - the Foreign Minister visit and address in Berlin a day later. We addressed the thematic of that Black Jaguar Mark 8 in the picture by Check Point Charlie - the same make/model Judge E J Stiven drove in Seychelles ex Zanzibar. We are not talking about he Car we are talking about high/Intelligence Cold War era. Events in other parts of the world as we were in Berlin - yet the President J A Michel delivers his 2016 Nation address as if in current Unified Germany the Bundestage they are all bloody fools idiots and morons/imbecile, uneducated, unintelligent he is the only wise fool in the world and planet Seychelles. The German police and intelligence Service, USA, British, French, Russian was monitoring my person and the thematic on my lap top activities beside their own capabilities they are very aware what took place and then he/ those who declared he had won the election.
http://www.berlin.de/.../1205507/source/1363607417/418x316/

Unless the President was never Communist - never involved in SPUP he must recognize this picture - beside he purport he is a Grand Master of Seychelles Masonic lodge.
http://www.spaans-henke.de/.../bundestag.../bundestag-01.JPG



Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

President James Michel’s State of the nation address

Post  Sirop14 on Wed Feb 17, 2016 2:53 pm

President James Michel’s State of the nation address

17-February-2016
Ensuring economic growth with social justice and stability

President James Michel delivered his 12th State of the nation address to the Seychelles National Assembly yesterday, placing emphasis on social justice, welfare, the fight against drugs, healthcare improvement, democracy and good governance.
Mr Michel said the year 2015 produced a positive economic outlook for the country.
He noted that a growth rate of 4.34% was recorded and the foreign exchange reserve in the Central Bank was US $536 million. This represents almost five months’ worth of importation.
Seychelles continued to service its external debt regularly, and reduce debt stock to 62% of our Gross National Product (GNP). Seychelles remained well on track to achieving its public debt reduction objective of 50% of GNP in 2018. A level which many European countries have not been able to reach. The rate of inflation was 3.2% at the end of 2015.
The tourism industry experienced considerable growth, with a 19% increase in visitor arrivals, and a 17% increase in revenue. Approximately 40,000 Seychellois travelled overseas last year, which represents 44% of Seychelles’ population. The government enabled 1,612 people to enter employment in 2015, and the unemployment rate was at 4.2%.
Up to December 2015 a total of 538 loans valued at R507.3 million were approved under the small and medium enterprise (SME) scheme; a total of 117 new small businesses were created, and this brings the number of small and medium enterprises in Seychelles to 2,290.
More than 270 Seychellois obtained university degrees either from the University of Seychelles, or from universities overseas.
Statistics show that today, approximately 75% of Seychellois families are owners of their homes.
Seychellois purchasing power has increased, mainly as a result of the reduction in the cost of fuel, electricity, water, LPG gas and certain goods.
“I represent a party that has struggled for more than 50 years for the liberation, freedom, dignity and emancipation of all Seychellois. We fought for social justice, for equality, for fraternity, for unity. And we’ve taken the Seychellois nation far – very far – over the 38 years that we have been in power,” said President Michel.
“We will continue working to build an even better Seychelles. Encompassing change, because it is we, Parti Lepep – and always we – who have brought about real change in this country. And we shall always do it when necessary. With respect to our fellow citizens. In peace and unity. In dignity. With fraternity and compassion. Without hatred and without the desire for revenge. Without personal agendas. Without JCBs, without bulldozers. Without arson. Without stamping on anyone.”
He said this year Seychelles will celebrate the 40th anniversary of Independence, which would be a moment for greater solidarity and national unity.
“If we have reached where we are today, it is thanks to our determination and our conviction that, within us Seychellois, we have the courage to stand up and do what is right for our Seychelles. We have done it TOGETHER. Now my call as the President of Seychelles is for us all to rally together to consolidate our unity, to preserve our stability and to continue to make the Seychelles that we love remain that country of peace and unity in the world,” he added.
We will come back on the President’s speech in our future issues

http://www.nation.sc/article.html?id=248444

‘Let’s rally together to consolidate our unity’

http://www.nation.sc/article.html?id=248446

Discours de l’Etat de la Nation : Les conseils de district renforceront le développement communautaire

http://www.nation.sc/article.html?id=248443


Lasanble pou konsider lalwa pour redwir manda prezidan a selman 2 term 5-an

http://www.nation.sc/article.html?id=248442

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

STATE OF THE NATION ADDRESS? NO WAY!!!!!”

Post  Sirop14 on Wed Feb 17, 2016 6:17 pm

STATE OF THE NATION ADDRESS? NO WAY!!!!!”


Op-Ed by Ralph and Josette Hoarau.
It was supposed to have been a State of the Nation address by a President addressing his people and his nation, but instead it was a party political broadcast by a party leader or cult leader addressing the fanatics of his party or his cult. It was a partisan address punctuated with references to his party slogans such as “together”. In short it was rich in rhetoric and poor on substance. It lacked strategic national vision, as a proper State of the Nation address should be. Regardless though, one thing we know for sure is that the man who read it certainly did not write it!

In much of that party political broadcast, James Michel sounded like the washerwomen of old at the riverside making “Kankan” with a lot of his tirades directed at members of the public who support the opposition and who express themselves on social media. In some cases he sounded like a man desperately begging for recognition from the more than half of the population that voted for the opposition. This was unbecoming of a Head of State! Ironically a lot of the new ideas that he announced, he blatantly stole from the opposition manifesto. In other instances such as, “We have no lessons to learn from anyone on anti-corruption. We have taken harsh measures where corruption existed”; one wonders if the man is joking or of if he is simply a parrot repeating what others tell him. As for this, “It was a fierce battle, against several forces”, Mr. Michel with his selective amnesia omitted the fact that it was actually the Opposition against PL and all the resources of the State that were illegally being employed.

As for the speech itself, it lacked substance and was replete with glaring inconsistencies, discrepancies and misrepresentation of facts. It would take volumes to decipher all that was wrong, so I will select a few points only.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/71404671096/permalink/10153255843161097/

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

AG needs to be impartial, rules Mathilda Twomey

Post  Sirop14 on Wed Feb 17, 2016 8:18 pm

AG needs to be impartial, rules Mathilda Twomey

The client of the Attorney General is the government of Seychelles and the government of Seychelles' interests might not be the same as those of President elect or an incumbent, the Chief Justice said yesterday, before giving a warning to the Attorney General and telling him he had overstepped his role.
Chief Justice Mathilda Twomey yesterday gave a warning to Attorney General (AG) Ronny Goviden, telling him that he had "overstepped his position" by taking a stand on Wavel Ramkalawan's the petition alleging irregularities during the 2015 Presidential election. She stated that the role of an Attorney General is to remain impartial, and that the Attorney General is not there to represent any party, but is there to advise the court independently.
Consequently, the court struck out the statements he made in his affidavit with regards to the petition, claiming that no illegal practices took place during the first and second round of the Presidential election. Mr Ramkalawan, the leader of the Seychelles National Party (SNP) had asked the court to remove the AG from the list of respondents, following the latter's assertion that he “totally supports the two respondents”, namely James Michel and the Election Commission.
Quoting the Constitution, CJ Twomey said that “according to Article 76 Section 10 of the Constitution, it provides that ‘in the exercise of the power invested in the Attorney General by clause 4, the Attorney General shall not be subject to the direction of any other person or authority'."
She explained that when the Attorney General is named as a respondent in the light of this article, his overall duty is to his client, which is the government of Seychelles". She further noted that in an election petition, the best interests of the government are possibly separate from those of the individual hopeful candidates, the President elect, or the incumbent President.
The application to strike off the AG as a party to the petition alleging irregularities during the 2015 Presidential election was filed two weeks ago during the first mention of the case. This followed the filing of the three respondents’ defense before the Constitutional Court. The AG had filed his affidavit in support of the two other respondents even before they had filed their defense.
Attorney General Govinden is thus still a party to the case as a legal advisor but has been given restrictions for the election petition case and was asked by the court to exercise restraint before making any comments. TODAY could not get a reaction from Mr Govinden.
Additionally, the court struck out the Principal State Counsel David Esparon's affidavit in support of the AG. In this affidavit, Mr Esparon puts on record his belief that the elections were free from irregularities. CJ Mathilda Twomey stated that because the affidavit is “placed solely on personal knowledge and leaves no ability to prove, as such, this affidavit fails to meet the requirements of Section 170 and cannot be admitted into the court records.”
The court therefore ruled that the affidavit be struck out.
The two election petitions alleging irregularities during the Presidential election were filed on 28 December 2015 and 5 January 2016 respectively, after the Presidential runoff which took place on 16, 17 and 18 December.
Inset
Trial begins
The hearing began after the ruling on the matter of the AG's position and focused on the definition of votes cast. Mr Ramkalawan’s lawyer, Bernard Georges, sought to define the meaning of votes cast by explaining that votes cast meant all votes rather than valid votes alone.
Lawyer for James Michel, Basil Hoareau submitted for his part that the Constitution has always provided people with the right to vote in as much as they in turn respect certain regulations, in accordance with the laws of the land, and that failure to comply with such regulations will result in the Electoral Commission not counting their votes as being valid.
After hearing all points from both sides, Chief Justice Towmey noted that while many countries do include a box on ballot papers for voters who wish to register a blank vote, in Seychelles this is not the case.
“How does one construe this?” she then asked in reference to how one would decide which invalid votes to count and which to discount. She further asked whether Seychellois would intentionally spoil votes to make a point or whether this stemmed rather from a lack of education.
After yesterday's session, Mr Ramkalawan’s lawyer, Bernard Georges, told TODAY that he was happy with the decision regarding the Attorney General an d hopes that he can get his points across in court in order to prove his case.

The hearing continues today from 9am until noon, and reconvenes at 2pm until 4pm.

https://www.facebook.com/todayinsey/posts/945167675521043:0

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Seychelles Election Petitions

Post  Sirop14 on Thu Feb 18, 2016 10:32 am

Seychelles Election Petitions
TODAY received this letter from Australia before the Constitutional Court struck out statements by the Attorney General in his affidavit with regards to the election petitions claiming that no illegal practices took place during the first and second round of the Presidential election.
Dear Editor
A critical analysis of the role of the Attorney-General, the Defence of the Attorney-General (3rd Respondent) and the supporting Affidavit
The “First Law Officer” of any country is the Attorney-General who has the role of principal legal advisor to the government and is responsible for the administration of justice. That role dates back to thirteenth century England, evolving over the years, to protect, preserve and promote the rule of law.
https://www.facebook.com/todayinsey/posts/945525035485307

Constitutional Court


To summon or not to summon James Michel?
Should James Michel be summoned to court to give evidence?
This was what was debated in court yesterday during the second day of the hearing of the election petition. The request made by Bernard Georges, was objected to by both Mr Michel's lawyer and the AG.
Should James Michel testify in court? This is the question that occupied most of yesterday's hearing of the election petition alleging irregularities in the 2015 Presidential election.

https://www.facebook.com/todayinsey/posts/945527425485068:0

Wavel Wankalawan calls on President Michel to resign
https://www.facebook.com/todayinsey/photos/a.414720138565802.83316.414719135232569/945534985484312/?type=3&theater

Finding the Law in Seychelles
http://www.nyulawglobal.org/globalex/Seychelles.html

Databases | SAFLII
http://www.saflii.org/content/databases

Seychelles - Courts & Case-Law - WorldLII
http://www.worldlii.org/catalog/55865.html


http://thecommonwealth.org/project/strengthening-capacity-judiciary-seychelles

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Mark Zuckerberg in Berlin 26/2/16

Post  Sirop14 on Sat Feb 27, 2016 8:14 am

Mark Zuckerberg in Berlin 26/2/16


We do not know if anybody from the Opposition, Justice, Diplomatic and NGO picked up the same train of thought as we have. In Europe, US and the Indian Ocean the Protocol for anti Terror Legislation still work - had the activities of the Seychelles December 18th resulted in a serious Terrorist incident - Facebook would have been compel before the International Justice to retrieve most of the communication, posting done, undertaken by the many individuals, be they SPPF/PL, SBC, Ministers, Observers Team, the Oppositions, Outside parties, News Papers - they would have been studied by the relevant Justice and special agents/Police to prove and disprove if they had been involved in a Terrorist activities which had led/cause the Terrorist incident.

By the same argument Facebook have the capacity to retrieve a good/great deal of the communication/posting which took place prior to the Votes being counted, announced and published - when SBC went off the air and the Power in Seychelles failed. Beside they do monitor Facebook activities for Regulatory purpose - from the posting they can for their own internal objective study the contents of the communication and this case the data being publish on Facebook the night of the Presidential election .

In the Constitutional Court hearing Facebook posting was mentioned, video and other Communication - at the Berlin several presentation , Facebook Executive stated they were committed to a future where Facebook would have a greater objectivity, role and function - reporting capabilities - this is a good moment/incident to test the capacity of Facebook - to all the relevant International bodies who monitor fraudulent election procedures, publication this is such occasion. Should they refuse the Opposition can request to the Seychelles Constitutional Court to request that Facebook use their capacity and present/make available the data they have on the Presidential election night. Beside they Facebook in Berlin talked how they can better serve society and world to prevent wars, conflicts and exile/refugee action - action that can led to situation causing people to be persecuted, oppressed etc and become exile/refugees.

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Icus creates truth, reconciliation and peace commission

Post  Sirop14 on Sat Feb 27, 2016 7:36 pm

Icus creates truth, reconciliation and peace commission

Independent Conservative Union of Seychelles (Icus) held an extraordinary general caucus on Saturday February 20, 2016 at Victoria House conference room to effect the necessary changes to its executive committee, inter alia.
In accordance with Icus’ Articles of Association a resolution to dissolve the existing executive committee was passed unanimously and the existing executive committee was dissolved. Following balloting a new executive committee was appointed.
The new committee passed a number of resolutions and one of the resolutions is to create a Truth, Reconciliation and Peace Commission because Icus believes that out of all the current political parties in Seychelles it is in a better position to create such a commission. The new commission is called Seychelles Truth, Reconciliation and Peace Commission (STRPC). In Icus’ view, Parti Lepep cannot create such a commission because they are the alleged perpetrators, Linyon Sanzman appears to be in opposite poles has not done so and Popular Democratic Party (PDM) has not made its position clear. Icus also believes that we cannot let matters just drift and drift with no resolution in sight while at the same time our nation is divided and there is plenty of hate and unhappiness in our midst. The last two rounds of Presidential elections have brought about even more division in our society and something must be done to put away this anger, to put our past squarely into history and to create peace and harmony in our small nation. Seychelles is not the only country in the world with a lurid history but nonetheless a resolution must now be achieved for the sake of our next generation.

Appointing the chair of the commission
Following discussions with many people at all levels of our society during the election campaigns in December 2015; Icus has launched this non-partisan commission and now Icus backs away. Icus has appointed Barry Laine, who is a well known and respected member of our society, to chair this commission and to prepare the grounds for a number of senior and also well-respected members of our society, who have been approached, to join this commission.
Mr Laine has carried out a great deal of research, which will be shown at the press conference, into how other countries have handled their reconciliation process and the executive committee of Icus believes he is the right person and he has the right qualifications to chair this commission.

Composition of the commission
The commission will consist of the chairman, two leaders from our main religious groups, one judge and one woman. The commission will be a body corporate, an association or non-governmental organisation (NGO) and will also have support staff who will include a secretary, treasurer and researcher, inter alia. Funding will come from a government grant and from donations and fund raising.

Aims and objectives of the commission
To create a platform for anyone who has been affected by the coup d’état to come forward and seek a resolution and achieve closure. It will look at a period from 1977 to 2015. The commission will listen and record events which occurred and recommend a path towards resolution. If requested the commission will arrange for the victim and the perpetrator to meet and achieve closure. Anonymity will be provided at all times but the media will be kept informed. The commission will not release any names or addresses or any details of the matters discussed during its activities except where all parties agree certain information if released will benefit the harmony of our society. The main aim of the commission is to bring about closure and to restore peace and harmony in our society.

Modus operandi of the commission
This press release contains initial guidelines and when the full team is onboard a final Articles of Association will form the legal framework of the commission. No member of the commission will be allowed to operate individually and all matters will be dealt with within the commission. Referrals will of course be made but these will come from the commission and all hearings will be held in private. The commission will have no power to prosecute and it does not want any either and the commission’s work will be exempted from disclosure. For security purposes all documents relating to the work of the commission will be stored in the vault of a bank and two keys, held by two individual members of the commission, will be required to open the box.

Restorative and not retributive process
The commission’s work will be restorative and not retributive. This commission is not being set up to punish anyone but to seek the truth if possible so that the victims and the perpetrators alike can achieve closure. Throughout history and time again and again where any reconciliation process has tried to be retributive the process has faltered. The commission will make recommendations for certain corrective actions to be undertaken especially where properties have been involved. Where loss of loved ones have been experienced the commission will provide a path to closure. The emphasis of the commission will be on reparation of relationship, rehabilitation of the aggrieved and restoration of dignity and pride.
One must be mindful that the alleged atrocities allegedly committed by the government agents at the time and the burden of proof in relation to guilt may prove difficult to establish. Our situation is different from other countries which have gone through this process. Icus believes this is a Seychellois matter for Seychellois to resolve and not for the International Court in The Hague. Time has changed and we must now reconcile the past and move Seychelles forward for the benefit of the new generation. Their progress is adversely affected by past events which have not been reconciled.
Duration of the commission
The commission will meet every two weeks and will last for a year and this can be extended to two years if required.
International impact
Sir James Mancham is being requested by a number of countries and statesmen from around the world to make Seychelles a Centre for Peace. This is wonderful and it can be done, however we would argue that this cannot be achieved while we have not resolved our own peace. It is not that we wish to resolve our own peace because of this proposition we want to do so because the time is right and it is something that has been talked about for several years now but no action. Icus is a new and progressive political party with an executive committee made up of mostly young people who want this matter resolved.
Timeline
The commission should be ready to start its work in one month’s time.

Contributed by Icus
http://www.nation.sc/article.html?id=248560

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

WAVEL RAMKELAWAN : « Les Seychellois veulent un changement politique »

Post  Sirop14 on Mon Feb 29, 2016 9:32 am

WAVEL RAMKELAWAN : « Les Seychellois veulent un changement politique »


ARTICLE PARU DANS WEEK-END | 28 FEBRUARY, 2016 - 16:00

Notre invité de ce dimanche est le révérend Wavel Ramkelawan, candidat de l'opposition aux dernières élections présidentielles seychelloises. Dans cette interview réalisée cette semaine dans l'archipel, il nous livre son analyse de la situation politique et sociale de son pays. Il affirme également qu'après presque quarante ans de parti unique, les Seychellois sont prêts au changement politique qui se fera lors des prochaines élections, que ce soit lors du troisième tour des présidentielles ou lors des prochaines législatives.

Depuis que les élections sont démocratiques aux Seychelles, c'est la première fois que l'opposition se retrouve avec moins de 200 votes de différence du parti gouvernemental. Comment expliquez-vous cette fulgurante progression ?
Avec la formation de Lalians Seychellois, avec Pat Pillay, c'est la première fois qu'il y a eu une implosion dans le parti au pouvoir depuis 1977. Politiquement, c'était difficile pour un partisan du PSP de venir rejoindre les rangs de mon parti. Pat Pillay a agi comme un pont pour franchir la rivière idéologique qui séparait nos deux partis depuis plus de trente ans. Du coup, d'anciens ministres du gouvernement René-Michel comme Simone de Commarmond et d'autres sont venus rejoindre les rangs de l'opposition et leurs partisans ont suivi. Cela a fait qu'aux dernières élections présidentielles, le parti au pouvoir est tombé sous la barre des 50% des suffrages.

Il faut aussi ajouter l'autre élément déterminant des dernières présidentielles seychelloises : pour la première fois l'opposition est parvenue à conclure une alliance électorale….
Vous savez, parvenir à créer l'unité au sein d'une opposition n'est pas chose facile. Il y a des compétitions entre partis et même entre personnes au sein des partis et des différences idéologiques aussi.

Les différences idéologiques existent-elles encore aux Seychelles ?
Je ne vous parle pas des grandes idéologies gauche/droite avec leurs extrêmes et leurs centres d'autrefois. Mais il existe des différences sur la manière d'appréhender certains sujets de société, sur l'économie, entre autres.

Quel a été l'élément clé qui a permis en décembre de l'année dernière l'union de l'opposition ?
Avant le premier tour des élections, tous les leaders des partis de l'opposition se sont rencontrés et ont convenu que chaque parti irait seul au premier tour sans attaquer les autres. Nous avons également convenu qu'au deuxième tour, nous allions soutenir le leader qui aurait obtenu le plus de voix dans l'opposition. C'est sur la base de cet accord que nous sommes allés aux élections et que je suis devenu le représentant de l'opposition. Pour le deuxième tour, l'opposition a pris pour nom l'Union du Changement. C'est cet accord, qui a été respecté, qui a permis de réussir l'union de l'opposition et sa victoire. Mais je dois dire que le parti de James Michel a fait campagne au deuxième tour pour essayer de casser l'union de l'opposition en disant qu'on ne pouvait pas voter pour le Révérend Démon, c'est-à-dire moi. La moitié de l'électorat n'a pas écouté James Michel et ses insultes. Cette union de l'opposition continue et nous travaillons ensemble pour les prochaines élections de l'Assemblée nationale qui auront lieu dans quelques mois.

C'est une chose de faire l'union dans l'opposition et une autre de la réussir dans un gouvernement. Êtes-vous conscient qu'au sein du pouvoir cette union peut voler en éclats avec les crises d'ambition des uns et des autres ?
J'ai déjà commencé à sentir certaines choses entre le premier et le deuxième tours, des questions sur le nombre de ministères qui devrait revenir à chaque parti, par exemple. Mais je suis convaincu que l'expérience de l'union, qui a donné de très bons résultats, va nous permettre de régler ce genre de problèmes dans le dialogue. Même s'il y a des dissensions dans l'opposition, nous sommes d'accord sur l'essentiel : il faut changer de président et de gouvernement.

C'est ça l'essentiel du programme de l'opposition : prendre la place du président et de son gouvernement ?
C'est le résumé fondamental de notre objectif, qui est partagé par une majorité de Seychellois. Vous savez, les issues du pays sont simples : il faut mettre fin à la corruption qui règne au gouvernement et s'attaquer aux fléaux sociaux qui gangrènent les Seychelles. Savez-vous que les Seychelles sont n°1 per capita dans le monde en ce qui concerne le nombre de consommateurs d'héroïne ? Savez-vous que nous sommes également n°1 en ce qui concerne le nombre de prisonniers ? Mais il y a également les conséquences des ravages de la drogue aux Seychelles comme la prostitution, le child abuse et d'autres problèmes sociaux et moraux. Savez-vous que le soir, à Mahé, il y a des filles qui se prostituent comme celles du Jardin de la Compagnie à Port-Louis ? On n'avait jamais vu ça ici auparavant.

Mais il semble que les Seychelles ont un département, une instance gouvernementale pour lutter contre le trafic de drogue….
Cette instance ne fonctionne pas bien parce que certains gros trafiquants soutiennent le parti Lepep, sont protégés. On ne s'attaque pas aux gros trafiquants protégés mais aux petits consommateurs qu'on envoie en prison. Du fait qu'il y a des trous dans le filet de protection, la drogue passe et est vendue aux jeunes. Aujourd'hui aux Seychelles on est obligé d'importer de la main-d'œuvre étrangère pour travailler comme stevedore dans le port pour transporter le poisson. Où est la main-d'œuvre seychelloise pour ce travail me demanderez-vous ? Elle est en prison pour des délits liés à la drogue, à la criminalité. Le chef juge des Seychelles vient de déclarer que plus de 70% des cas devant la justice ont une connexion avec la drogue. Comment peut-on dire que le gouvernement fait un bon travail dans ce domaine avec de telles statistiques. Et en même temps, l'hépatite est en train de gagner du terrain et le nombre de personnes atteintes du VIH augmente. Les Seychelles sont dans une situation sanitaire grave et l'opposition pense qu'il faut prendre des mesures d'urgence dans ce domaine.

Quels sont les points de divergence au sein de l'opposition ?
Nous sommes d'accord sur l'essentiel mais avons des petites divergences sur la vitesse d'exécution de notre programme. Par exemple sur ce qui s'est passé au cours des trente-huit dernières années pour pouvoir rendre justice, punir les coupables et faire la réunification du peuple seychellois. Certains veulent une approche très sévère, d'autres penchent pour une approche plus mesurée.

Comment expliquez-vous que la moitié des électeurs seychellois, qui soutiennent le régime depuis plus de trente ans, ait voté contre lui aux dernières élections ?
Les Seychellois ont toujours voulu changer de gouvernement mais ils ne l'ont pas fait à cause de la frayeur qui règne dans le pays depuis 1977. Aujourd'hui les choses vont un peu mieux au niveau de la démocratie, mais le Seychellois se demande toujours si son enfant pourra poursuivre ses études, si en cas de maladie grave il sera envoyé par le gouvernement pour se faire soigner à l'étranger, si ses enfants auront droit au travail pour lequel ils sont qualifiés, si lui-même obtiendra la promotion méritée dans son travail, s'il aura droit à une maison s'il montre ouvertement qu'il est dans l'opposition. Le Seychellois a toujours au fond de lui cette frayeur, il ne va pas aux meetings publics mais au moment des élections il s'exprime librement. Il y a un changement de mindset chez le Seychellois. Depuis les dernières élections, il se dit que l'opposition est forte et que le temps du changement politique est arrivé. Et que changement n'est pas la fin du monde mais le début d'un nouveau, que le soleil va continuer à se lever et à se coucher. Il faut aussi savoir que les Seychelles ont toujours été coupées en deux politiquement. Avant le coup d'État, Albert René représentait 48% et James Mancham 52%. Mais aujourd'hui pour la première fois, nous sommes à 50/50, mais les voix qui sont allées au gouvernement l'ont été à cause de l'argent partagé et qui n'a pas suffi à assurer la victoire à James Michel. La marge de l'opposition va définitivement augmenter aux prochaines élections.

Donc l'opposition va affronter ces élections ensemble, comme les présidentielles ?
Nous sommes tombés d'accord pour enregistrer l'Union du Changement comme un parti politique pour aller aux élections législatives.

Êtes-vous confiant de la victoire de l'opposition aux prochaines législatives ?
Nous ne nous questionnons pas sur comment faire pour gagner les prochaines législatives, mais sur comment faire pour avoir une très grande victoire. Aux dernières élections, l'opposition avait remporté 18 des 25 circonscriptions. Au deuxième tour nous avons eu 12 sièges et le parti du gouvernement 13. Nous pensons que la vague commencée avec les présidentielles ne peut que grossir pour les législatives. Je crois que pour la première fois les Seychellois se disent : Allons essayer le changement après plus de trente ans au pouvoir du même parti. D'autant que l'opposition a fait un excellent travail à l'Assemblée nationale au cours des dernières années en posant les questions et les motions qu'il faut.

Ne craignez-vous pas que les mesures économiques et sociales annoncées par le président James Michel lors de son dernier discours à la nation changent l'attitude de l'électorat seychellois ?
James Michel s'est contenté de mettre en pratique les mesures préconisées par l'opposition dans son manifeste électoral et qu'il avait vivement critiqué. C'est nous qui avons proposé l'augmentation de la pension de vieillesse, l'augmentation des salaires des travailleurs, le treizième mois, la lutte contre les drogues dures, contre la corruption et la diminution du barème de l'income tax. Ce sont des mesures qui sont dans le programme de l'opposition et que le gouvernement a repris à son compte. Mais les Seychellois ne sont pas bêtes, ils savent que ce sont les idées de l'opposition que le gouvernement est en train de mettre en pratique. C'est l'opposition qui a secoué le manguier qui permet au peuple de récolter les mangues. L'autre jour, une vieille personne est venue me remercier d'avoir fait augmenter sa pension. L'écart entre le gouvernement et l'opposition diminue aussi parce que les Seychellois se rendent compte que nous sommes sérieux, que nous proposons des idées qui améliorent leurs conditions de vie.

Vous pensez que le gouvernement en place ne réagira pas et ne s'organisera pas pour remporter les élections législatives ?
Ils sont dépassés et font campagne en dénigrant leurs adversaires. Mais ils ont déjà tout dit sur nous et ça n'a pas marché et ça ne marchera pas parce que nous sommes unis. D'ailleurs, d'une certaine manière, c'est James Michel qui avait poussé l'opposition à s'unir en déclarant dans une interview à votre journal que l'opposition n'existait pas et qu'il remporterait les présidentielles par walkover. Mais malgré sa chute, James Michel est toujours arrogant comme on l'a entendu dans son discours à la nation où il critique… le choix d'une chanson utilisée pendant la campagne !

La situation économique des Seychelles permet-elle de financer les mesures de l'opposition adoptées par le gouvernement et annoncées dans le discours à la nation ?
L'économie est encore fragile et le gouvernement doit être plus sérieux dans la collection des taxes. Par exemple, l'industrie touristique ne récolte pas la totalité de ses revenus parce que dans trop de cas l'argent payé par les touristes reste à l'étranger, ne rentre pas dans le pays, ne bénéficie pas aux Seychellois. Il y a aussi dans ce secteur des problèmes de corruption. James Michel ne peut mettre en application les propositions qu'il nous a volées avec le système actuellement en place. On ne peut pas faire une vieille voiture qui tombe en ruines rouler à cent mille à l'heure sans faire une révision totale de son moteur. La seule manière de faire est de changer de gouvernement, de revoir tout le système et c'est ce que l'opposition a proposé dans son manifeste. En fin de compte, au lieu de voler nos idées, James Michel devrait demander son admission dans l'opposition ou prendre sa retraite. Le problème de James Michel, de son gouvernement et de son parti c'est qu'ils sont dépassés à cause de l'usure du pouvoir et de ses abus.

Mais vous aussi vous faites de la politique depuis des années. Cela n'use pas dans l'opposition ?
Pas de la même manière. C'est vrai que cela fait 23 ans que je fais de la politique. Mais je l'ai fait en tenant le même langage, avec le même objectif : provoquer une réflexion de la population, lui montrer qu'il peut prendre son destin en main et aller vers le changement. Aujourd'hui, je me rends compte que le message est passé et que le mindset du Seychellois a changé et qu'il est prêt à transformer son pays pour le meilleur. La machine est maintenant lancée, on ne peut pas l'arrêter.

Wavel Ramkelawan, rêvez-vous d'être le prochain locataire de la State House ?
Ce n'est pas mon rêve. Si les Seychellois me le demandent, je serai président de la République. Je serai capable de faire le travail pour transformer notre pays, pour redonner sa fierté à chaque Seychellois, pour mener un combat acharné contre les fléaux qui attaquent notre société. Tout cela se fera dans la transparence pour permettre à notre pays d'aller plus loin encore dans le développement.

Si devenir Président n'est pas votre rêve, quel est votre rêve d'homme ?
De permettre aux Seychelles de devenir le contraire de ce qu'elles sont actuellement, de l'état où le parti au pouvoir depuis plus de trente ans les a menées. Je rêve d'un pays où les institutions fonctionneraient dans la transparence, où les revenus seraient utilisés pour tous les Seychellois, pas seulement pour une petite poignée. Je rêve d'un pays solidaire, propre, sain.

Avez-vous autour de vous les compétences nécessaires pour faire passer vos rêves du stade de discours à la réalité, ce qui est la principale difficulté en politique ?
Ces compétences existent dans l'opposition. Nous avons non seulement les cadres et les managers, mais aussi des leaders sans des domaines spécifiques. Mais il existe aussi en dehors de l'opposition des personnes compétentes qui sont aujourd'hui obligées de supporter James Michel et son gouvernement et qui demain auront leur rôle à jouer. Aujourd'hui, quand un Seychellois va demander un permis, un service auquel tout le monde a droit, on regarde s'il support le gouvernement ou l'opposition, et le traitement est différent. Nous disons : ce n'est plus possible et c'est ça qui va faire le pays avancer quand un civil servant comprendra qu'il est au service de tous les Seychellois, pas uniquement de celui des partisans du parti au pouvoir. Les Seychelles n'appartiennent pas seulement à ceux qui sont les partisans du parti au pouvoir comme cela été le cas au cours des derniers années. Pour le moment, la machine du gouvernement roule sur deux roues, nous allons la faire rouler sur quatre une fois que nous aurons pris le pouvoir.

L'opposition conteste les résultats des élections présidentielles devant la Cour suprême. Pour quelles raisons ?
Il y a deux procès, le premier est légal. La Constitution prévoit que pour être élu le président, il faut avoir plus de 50% des votes enregistrés. Nous demandons à la cour de statuer si la Commission électorale a bien interprété cet article de la Constitution en comptabilisant les voix. Si la cour nous donne raison, aucun des deux candidats n'a obtenu 50% des voix et il faut un troisième tour de l'élection présidentielle. Le deuxième procès concerne une série d'irrégularités que nous avons notées pendant les élections et le dépouillement des voix ainsi que des décisions prises par James Michel en tant que président au cours de la période électorale : l'argent distribué, l'achat de cartes d'identité, la grâce présidentielle, des consignes de vote données aux militaires.

Êtes-vous confiant de remporter ces procès ?
Je répondrai à cette question en disant que je crois qu'il y a de fortes possibilités pour que les Seychelles aillent bientôt voter pour le troisième tour des présidentielles.

Quel est votre commentaire sur la "déportation" de l'avocat mauricien Sanjay Bhukory des Seychelles ?
Nous considérons ce qui s'est passé comme une aberration du gouvernement. Je considère que dans ce cas, le gouvernement s'est comporté de façon honteuse contre un citoyen d'un pays plus qu'ami depuis toujours. Cette décision du gouvernement démontre le degré de désespoir dans lequel le gouvernement de James Michel se trouve après les élections présidentielles. Il y a aussi eu les réactions contre l'évêque anglican, qui est par ailleurs un Mauricien, parce que dans une interview, il avait déclaré qu'il ne serait pas surpris qu'il y avait un troisième tour aux présidentielles après les procès. On a fait toute une campagne contre lui et contre Deepa Bookhun qui dirigeait le journal Today en l'accusant d'être pro opposition alors qu'elle ne faisait que faire son travail de journaliste. Ils sont paniqués et font n'importe quoi.

Qu'auriez-vous fait à la place de James Michel dans les circonstances actuelles ?
Si j'avais été à la place de James Michel, mon discours sur l'état de la nation aurait été un discours de réconciliation. J'aurais dit aux Seychellois que les élections ont démontré que le pays est divisé en deux politiquement et que nous devrions trouver une manière de faire pour utiliser toutes les ressources du pays pour toud les Seychellois. J'aurais même proposé un forum pour que les deux partis politiques se rencontrent publiquement pour discuter de l'état de la nation et des solutions pour l'améliorer. J'aurais même demandé que ce forum soit télévise afin que tous les Seychellois puissent suivre cet exercice de transparence démocratique. Au lieu de ça, nous avons eu droit à un discours de vainqueur aux élections, ce qui est loin d'être prouvé.

Terminons cette interview par une prise de rendez-vous. Lors de notre prochaine visite aux Seychelles, où est-ce qu'on pourra vous rencontrerai ?
Probablement à la State House où je serai installé après avoir remporté le troisième round des élections présidentielles, grâce à la volonté des Seychellois.

http://www.lemauricien.com/article/wavel-ramkelawan-les-seychellois-veulent-changement-politique

Sirop14

Posts : 5389
Join date : 2008-06-02

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Seychelles President James Michel calls Presidential Election

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 5 of 7 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum